4th Generation 2024 Toyota Tacoma Thread

ssun30

Expert
Messages
3,336
Reactions
7,434
https://toyota-club.net/files/faq/21-09-20_faq_t24-engine_en.htm

toyota-club's in-depth breakdown of the T24 engine. It has been up there for a while and I've questioned its lack of sophistication for its application (on the NX350). It's a less complicated engine than its predecessor 8AR-FTS.

Now we have the answer: it's designed primarily for utility vehicles like the Tacoma where simplicity is more valued. We all heard about the reliability nightmare of the electronic wastegate on Tundra's V35, no more in the T24. There is no sophisticated VVT mechanism like VVT-iW or VVT-iE found on almost every other Dynamic Force engine. Just a plain old VVT-i. The electric water pump is replaced by a simple belt-driven pump. There's no unnecessarily complicated electronic clutch-driven cooling fan we see on the V35. Just a fan. But all the mechanicals are manufactured based on the new innovations in the DF family to improve efficiency. Toyota has minimized the number of electronic parts that can malfunction on this engine.

What I don't understand is the 99.5mm reduced stroke compared to the A25's 103.5mm. This reduces displacement by 4% making it slightly less competitive on specifications vs. all the 2.5T+ competitors. (for reference if it was 2.5L the Tacoma would have a much more competitive 300PS and 450N.m instead of 283PS and 430N.m). But more importantly it's no longer the "magic stroke-to-bore ratio" of 1.2 Toyota has chosen on all of their DF engines. This is a sweet spot they found for efficiency and power and a common ratio makes it easier to calibrate for different displacements.
 

NomadDan

Follower
Messages
286
Reactions
349
People who buy the manual are also likely the more hardcore crowd who will likely modify the truck. This means all the factory modifications on the TRD Pro and Trailhunter are probably irrelevant for them anyway. Toyota know the data and possibly decided most modified trucks are the TRD Sport or TRD Offroad trim while TRD Pro and Trailhunter are for those who want capabilities out of the factory.
After thinking about it a bit more, I think you’re right. I know I fall into that group.

The Underground color that was first revealed on the 2023 Camry will be available on the Tacoma. I was hoping that would be the case, and I really like the color.
 

qtb007

Follower
Messages
402
Reactions
603
https://toyota-club.net/files/faq/21-09-20_faq_t24-engine_en.htm

toyota-club's in-depth breakdown of the T24 engine. It has been up there for a while and I've questioned its lack of sophistication for its application (on the NX350). It's a less complicated engine than its predecessor 8AR-FTS.

Now we have the answer: it's designed primarily for utility vehicles like the Tacoma where simplicity is more valued. We all heard about the reliability nightmare of the electronic wastegate on Tundra's V35, no more in the T24. There is no sophisticated VVT mechanism like VVT-iW or VVT-iE found on almost every other Dynamic Force engine. Just a plain old VVT-i. The electric water pump is replaced by a simple belt-driven pump. There's no unnecessarily complicated electronic clutch-driven cooling fan we see on the V35. Just a fan. But all the mechanicals are manufactured based on the new innovations in the DF family to improve efficiency. Toyota has minimized the number of electronic parts that can malfunction on this engine.

What I don't understand is the 99.5mm reduced stroke compared to the A25's 103.5mm. This reduces displacement by 4% making it slightly less competitive on specifications vs. all the 2.5T+ competitors. (for reference if it was 2.5L the Tacoma would have a much more competitive 300PS and 450N.m instead of 283PS and 430N.m). But more importantly it's no longer the "magic stroke-to-bore ratio" of 1.2 Toyota has chosen on all of their DF engines. This is a sweet spot they found for efficiency and power and a common ratio makes it easier to calibrate for different displacements.
Because they probably wanted to keep the distance of the centerline of the crank to the head deck identical between the two engines. They probably wanted a lot more meat on the piston to deal with the higher combustion pressures in cylinder. So, how do you get a thicker piston, a lower compression ratio, and keep it manufacturable on the same line as the A25. Shorten the stroke.
 

ssun30

Expert
Messages
3,336
Reactions
7,434
Because they probably wanted to keep the distance of the centerline of the crank to the head deck identical between the two engines. They probably wanted a lot more meat on the piston to deal with the higher combustion pressures in cylinder. So, how do you get a thicker piston, a lower compression ratio, and keep it manufacturable on the same line as the A25. Shorten the stroke.
I completely forgot about the difference in compression ratio. Good point. The A25A is Atkinson cycle so its physical stroke needs to be extended slightly over its effective stroke. T24 does not have Miller mode.

However, it makes me wonder how Mazda was able to make Skyactiv 2.5 and 2.5T share the same dimensions and built on the same line while running a considerable amount of boost on the 2.5T.
 
Last edited:

NomadDan

Follower
Messages
286
Reactions
349
I’d be curious to see what aftermarket mods there will be to up the power and how locked down Toyota has the ECU. I’m probably stuck with a 90s mentality and how easy it was to get more power out of a turbo cars with cheap mods like manual boost controllers. Another 50hp and 60-75 lb-ft torque would be nice.

If people are able to get 500hp out of a GR Yaris, it seems like a bit more power from the T24 ought to be achievable.
 

Gecko

Administrator
Messages
4,743
Reactions
11,361
I’d be curious to see what aftermarket mods there will be to up the power and how locked down Toyota has the ECU. I’m probably stuck with a 90s mentality and how easy it was to get more power out of a turbo cars with cheap mods like manual boost controllers. Another 50hp and 60-75 lb-ft torque would be nice.

If people are able to get 500hp out of a GR Yaris, it seems like a bit more power from the T24 ought to be achievable.

Some tuners have been able to open up Toyota SUVS: OTT, KDMax, Vivid, EKanoo, etc.

I bet you’ll see a tune for the 2.4 pretty fast, especially since it’s going into the Tacoma, 4Runner and Land Cruiser.
 

qtb007

Follower
Messages
402
Reactions
603
Oh good, another onslaught of stupid clickbait articles that basically find and replace the “GR Corolla” with “Tacoma 6MT” regarding the allocation process. Tacoma was a small percentage 6MT on the 3rd gen just like it will be for the 4th gen. The allocation process is the same. Great job, Jalopnik. You wrote an article that could be paraphrased with “Getting a 4th gen 6MT Tacoma will be no different than getting a 3rd gen 6MT Tacoma.”
 

carguy420

Admirer
Messages
741
Reactions
1,000
Oh good, another onslaught of stupid clickbait articles that basically find and replace the “GR Corolla” with “Tacoma 6MT” regarding the allocation process. Tacoma was a small percentage 6MT on the 3rd gen just like it will be for the 4th gen. The allocation process is the same. Great job, Jalopnik. You wrote an article that could be paraphrased with “Getting a 4th gen 6MT Tacoma will be no different than getting a 3rd gen 6MT Tacoma.”
Clowns continue being clowns.
 

carguy420

Admirer
Messages
741
Reactions
1,000
I completely forgot about the difference in compression ratio. Good point. The A25A is Atkinson cycle so its physical stroke needs to be extended slightly over its effective stroke. T24 does not have Miller mode.

However, it makes me wonder how Mazda was able to make Skyactiv 2.5 and 2.5T share the same dimensions and built on the same line while running a considerable amount of boost on the 2.5T.
On Mazda's Skyactiv G engines, their combustion chamber seems to be a deeper and larger volume design when compared to DF's flatter and shallower combustion chamber, the pistons on the naturally aspirated Skyactiv Gs have a really tall dome compared to naturally aspirated DF's pistons where there's barely a dome needed to achieve the same 13:1 static compression ratio, so dropping the static compression ratio of the Skyactiv G while still having decent piston thickness is probably much easier than with DF.
 

NomadDan

Follower
Messages
286
Reactions
349
Toyota’s website is showing the TRD Offroad Tacoma render with the low valance and without the high clearance bumper. That doesn’t make sense to me, so I’m hoping the render has the wrong front end on it (wouldn’t be the first time an initial TRD Offroad render had the wrong front end).
 

ssun30

Expert
Messages
3,336
Reactions
7,434
And once again I see "internet car enthusiasts" in comments saying they don't want one because it doesn't have a "2 door base trim manual with hybrid" option. I guess they just can't comprehend the idea that car companies are not in the business of selling used cars 20 years in the future :ROFLMAO:
 

GoHuskers

Fan
Messages
97
Reactions
109
I'm only interested in the I-ForceMax. hopefully, the waiting list won't be too long or dealers won't be too greedy about markups in 2025. I'll stay way from the 1st year gremlins :)