Toyota C-HR (New, Cheaper LE/XLE Trims Added for 2019)

spwolf

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I understand that completely. I switched to the RAV4 Hybrid a few years back due to reliability issues with my prior vehicle. It's been rock solid from a dependability standpoint, but it's definitely not a driver's car. Floaty-boaty, mediocre tire grip, non-existent steering feel, crashy suspension and weird acceleration are all good descriptors of the current RAV4 hybrid. It sounds like the new TNGA based vehicles like the C-HR and UX are supposed to address some of these issues.
indeed... C-HR does drive much better than Rav4... where are you from?

In the NA, Rav4 is a lot of space for small amount of money. In Europe, due to the taxes and customs, it is really a lot of money. For me, loaded hybrid would be $55k.
 

telithos

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indeed... C-HR does drive much better than Rav4... where are you from?

In the NA, Rav4 is a lot of space for small amount of money. In Europe, due to the taxes and customs, it is really a lot of money. For me, loaded hybrid would be $55k.
I'm from Florida in the U.S. Honestly, I prefer smaller vehicles. The RAV4 is far bigger than I really need, contrary to what my wife says :) . At the time of purchase, however, I wanted something I knew wasn't going to end up with me constantly at the dealership needing attention. Had it even been available, I'd likely not have gone with the C-HR either due to the really dated powertrain in it. 144HP is not much to work with in a 3300lbs vehicle. For most use cases, it's just fine, except that there is the occasional on ramp here that is set at an incline where you would be lucky to get within 20mph of being able to safely merge onto the interstate.

The final cost of the vehicle ended up being around $34k for the RAV4 limited, which isn't bad for what you get. It seems insane that my RAV4 gets significantly better combined gas mileage than my Mazda 3 did, given its less aerodynamic shape and *much* higher curb weight (props to Toyota here). If the C-HR had been around when I looked at the RAV4 and they had offered the option for a better powertrain, I probably would've gone for that though. I'm a big fan of small, well-packaged, nice driving vehicles, which only recently has become a thing in this country (still much more prevalent in Europe). I'm looking forward to the UX250H personally, even though it I think it will probably only end up attracting people who specifically want a smaller luxury vehicle.
 

spwolf

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@telithos I think UX will be "fast enough" but problem is always going to be the pricing in NA... around here NX is between $60k and $75k so there is quite a difference between them if UX starts at $45k.
 
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CIF

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I agree with both sides of the discussion here. While more trims, packages, and overall better marketing and presentation will help the C-HR somewhat in North America, it's still a vehicle built more for other overseas markets. A vehicle like the C-HR was always going to be a niche model in North America, AWD or no AWD. From the radical styling, to the impractical overall packaging, to where it sits price-wise in the North American Toyota lineup all ensure the C-HR as a niche model. It's not explicitly good or bad, it just is what it is.
 

spwolf

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Nice Civic wheels, I'm sure they ripped off a few more elements from the old CR-Vs...
Honda has some specific model that sold well in South Asia, which is what Rush is competing against, ah, it is BRV.

Here you go:



That itself though, is answer to Toyota Avanza basically, which was top seller in those countries since 2003. Honda did one up and created SUVish version of it (of Honda Mobilio) that also sold well... so now Toyota Rush has grown from its Rav4.2 roots to this.
 

Joaquin Ruhi

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After about a year's hiatus (a combination of Kaizen Factor being down for a while and the local South Florida press fleet being low on cars), I'm once again receiving a handful of press cars to review.

First up is the Toyota C-HR. My review has actually been influenced by Lexus Enthusiast and its forums in a number of ways. For one, mmcartalk's super-thorough reviews and constructive commentary led me to delve more deeply into interior details, materials and the like.

For another, Krew's latest IS Owners' Blog entry on the Charm of Lexus Safety System+ (directly cited on my KF review) led me to reevaluate some of my own preconceived notions and impressions. At the end of that blog entry, Krew rhetorically asked, "Do you trust the systems, or are you still fighting against your future robot overlords?" Consider the Toyota Safety Sense-P section of my review my answer to his question.

Finally, the C-HR actually whet my appetite for the upcoming Lexus UX 200 way more than I ever expected. I address that in the last section of my review.

Here's the link:
http://kaizen-factor.com/toyota-c-hr-scions-last-idiosyncratic-hurrah/
 
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Joaquin Ruhi

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spwolf

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Finally, the C-HR actually whet my appetite for the upcoming Lexus UX 200 way more than I ever expected. I address that in the last section of my review.

Here's the link:
http://kaizen-factor.com/toyota-c-hr-scions-last-idiosyncratic-hurrah/
So this is why I liked C-HR so much... compared to your version we have:
- hybrid and 1.2t (still too weak but not as old)
- colorful interiors and very premium for the class
- properly integrated nav (even if it is still a problem, it is less of one).

So as I said a number of times before, my problem was that hybrid was too weak (although in line with other base engines in class, or stronger) for my own driving on our highways (100 mph) as well as amount of wind noise at 100 mph.

UX seems like it should solve those, I can wait to try it!
 

ssun30

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If we take unrestricted Autobahn driving out of the picture. What is the typical level of power-to-weight ratio that is needed to be drivable in Europe? In U.K. I felt the 8kg/hp diesel XC60 to be very overpowered.
 

spwolf

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If we take unrestricted Autobahn driving out of the picture. What is the typical level of power-to-weight ratio that is needed to be drivable in Europe? In U.K. I felt the 8kg/hp diesel XC60 to be very overpowered.
we have many slow cars just like you in China, so I am not really sure. In city and b-roads driving, C-HR is perfectly fine... even on highways it is faster than NA petrols, it just needs higher end power option for upgrade. Which is what is coming.

Before you had 2-3 diesels in Corolla/Avensis/Rav4, now we will have 2 hybrid options for everything, and another cheap petrol just in case.
 

spwolf

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these days, maybe even more than 90% of A6 and 5 series are 2.0d with automatics, so people obviously find them "fast enough"... in non luxury class it is just worse, these are $60k cars.

edit: this is why if you ever read review of IS300h or GS300h, nobody really complained about speed, they considered it fine.

heck even with CHR, nobody complained about it, since other "base" engines are similar or slower.

It is just that getting to 100-105mph, cvt does drone due to lacking power and NVH is pretty poor... in the city, it is not that noticable since you arrive quickly at 30-50mph
 
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So this is why I liked C-HR so much... compared to your version we have:
- hybrid and 1.2t (still too weak but not as old)
- colorful interiors and very premium for the class
- properly integrated nav (even if it is still a problem, it is less of one).

So as I said a number of times before, my problem was that hybrid was too weak (although in line with other base engines in class, or stronger) for my own driving on our highways (100 mph) as well as amount of wind noise at 100 mph.

UX seems like it should solve those, I can wait to try it!
EU C-HRs also offer a moonroof and a 6 speed manual too...
 

spwolf

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EU C-HRs also offer a moonroof and a 6 speed manual too...


We get JBL wtih 700w, full LED leds with sequential turns, automatic parking, smart key, blah, blah... pretty much everything.

But C-HR is going to become 2nd best selling Toyota in Europe this year, it will outsell Corolla.
 

ssun30

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The GAC-Toyota C-HR and FAW-Toyota Izoa just launched in China. Pricing looks okay. They are more expensive than every competitor but they also have more power and equipment.

Fuel economy is 5.7L/100km or 41MPG, 0.7L/100km lower than the Camry 2.5 with similar weight. The fact that the C-HR weighs over 1500kg/3300lbs and takes 10.3s to do 0-100km/h is still hard to believe for me. That figure is on the brink of being underpowered on chinese roads. Can't imagine driving one of those 1.8 hybrids and 1.2Ts...

Surprisingly the C-HR Sport trim has ACA (active corner assist) which is a brake-based torque vectoring rear differential...I suppose it's the first FWD Toyota model to have TVD?
 
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