Lexus UX 250 and UX 250h Trademarks Registered in Australia

isanatori

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there is simply no way to get to 50% hybrid sales if they still have diesels for Yaris, Auris, Verso and Avensis.
I don't understand. Even in case of Toyota ditching diesels, people who want to buy diesel, they will buy a different brand. Can you elaborate on your thinking?
 

Joe

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(...) and because of their unawareness, they prefer to buy some shiny alloys rather than spending money for the benefit of the relaxing experience of an automatic gearbox.
I am starting to dislike your almost constant pejorative way of describing European consumers...: unamused:
Just for your information: in some European countries, small diesels offered in premium models are often the first choice for a lot of people as company car. In that case, the company often limits the choice to the manual version. And those companies don't allow bigger alloys in their car policy, either. What's even more: some brands don't even offer an A/T in their base diesel models or their so called low emission diesels (BMW 114d or 116d EDE, Mercedes-Benz A 180d 'BlueEfficiency'). On the other hand, Europeans historically tend to prefer manual shifting for a 'sportier feel'...
A different mindset and a different taste are not necessarily less cultivated. Just a matter of preference.
 

oem_is300

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I am starting to dislike your almost constant pejorative way of describing European consumers...: unamused:
Just for your information: in some European countries, small diesels offered in premium models are often the first choice for a lot of people as company car. In that case, the company often limits the choice to the manual version. And those companies don't allow bigger alloys in their car policy, either. What's even more: some brands don't even offer an A/T in their base diesel models or their so called low emission diesels (BMW 114d or 116d EDE, Mercedes-Benz A 180d 'BlueEfficiency'). On the other hand, Europeans historically tend to prefer manual shifting for a 'sportier feel'...
A different mindset and a different taste are not necessarily less cultivated. Just a matter of preference.
I sure wish diesels, and even more so, manual transmissions were a bit more common here in the states.

Today at Geneva Toyota revealed two crucial things:
a. Their new C-HR, powered with Prius 1.8l G4 engine, 1.2t turbo and 2.0l NA engine
b. Plans to expand European hybrid sales to 50% from current 24%.
More on topic, really interested in hearing about the 1.2t and the N/A 2.0L. The small turbocharged one should be cool, no performance monster, but I like seeing the new turbo engines coming from Toyota
 
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meth.ix

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UX 200, that's new. Maybe Lexus is starting to remove the "t" letter from their model names because turbocharged engines may become a regular thing soon like BMW. So UX 200 is possibly just the 2.0 Turbocharged engine in the NX.
 

oem_is300

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UX 200, that's new. Maybe Lexus is starting to remove the "t" letter from their model names because turbocharged engines may become a regular thing soon like BMW. So UX 200 is possibly just the 2.0 Turbocharged engine in the NX.
Interesting thought. I think this could be possible in the future when, like you said, turbocharged engines become common in the Lexus lineup.

I don't think it would be the same engine in this case though, unless they de-tune it a bit. With the UX much smaller than the NX, I don't think they would put in the exact same engine/power output
 

krew

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Europeans are more familiar with manual transmissions and because of their unawareness, they prefer to buy some shiny alloys rather than spending money for the benefit of the relaxing experience of an automatic gearbox.
This is your final warning -- either stop generalizing about Europeans or you will be removed from this thread.
 

krew

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2.0l CVT model is likely for Russia and is likely the same engine that might go into UX.
The one thing that has me scratching my head is the CVT -- is it common in Europe for Toyota to use a CVT with a non-hybrid powertrain?
 
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Hi! Yes, Toyota has lots of CVT vehicles with simple gasoline engines here.

I bet UX200 is going to be sold with the same engine as the NX200. The 3ZR-FAE, 2.0 litre, port injection, valvematic with 150hp/195Nm.

The UX250h will be the Camry/NX300hpowertrain. The HS250h received the 2AR-FXE engine a couple of years ago. The upgrade from the AZ to the AR left the 250 Designation unchanged. So the same powertrain is sold with 250 and 300 numbers already. There is no way Toyota will Slot in an extra engine between the 1,8 and the 2,5.
 
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The European trademark registrations kind of prove for me that this model will be based on the Toyota C-HR. The C-HR will be produced in Turkey and the trademarks were also registered in Turkey.
 

krew

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Hi! Yes, Toyota has lots of CVT vehicles with simple gasoline engines here.
Thanks!

The UX250h will be the Camry/NX300hpowertrain. The HS250h received the 2AR-FXE engine a couple of years ago. The upgrade from the AZ to the AR left the 250 Designation unchanged. So the same powertrain is sold with 250 and 300 numbers already. There is no way Toyota will Slot in an extra engine between the 1,8 and the 2,5.
It does seem like a stretch to have a 2.0L hybrid between the 1.8 and 2.5, but it does beg the question -- wouldn't a UX 300h be more impressive sounding than a UX 250h? Would it really just be to prevent cannibalization of the NX 300h?
 

isanatori

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I am starting to dislike your almost constant pejorative way of describing European consumers...: unamused:
I feel that you are effectively trying to target me. Forum administrators are ready to pull the trigger and ban me. Unawareness is not a bad thing. I am unaware for many things too, because I haven't experienced those things yet. What is offensive and rude in my wording I don't understand and my english language skill level is sufficient to support comprehension, I believe.
http://www.audioenglish.org/dictionary/unawareness.htm

Just for your information: in some European countries, small diesels offered in premium models are often the first choice for a lot of people as company car. In that case, the company often limits the choice to the manual version. And those companies don't allow bigger alloys in their car policy, either. What's even more: some brands don't even offer an A/T in their base diesel models or their so called low emission diesels (BMW 114d or 116d EDE, Mercedes-Benz A 180d 'BlueEfficiency'). On the other hand, Europeans historically tend to prefer manual shifting for a 'sportier feel'...
A different mindset and a different taste are not necessarily less cultivated. Just a matter of preference.
I don't think that you are correct. Judging from the way Europeans drive on public roads, I don't believe that modern automatics (when in their paddle-shifting mode) are less sportier than manual gearboxes. Manual gearbox is superior to automatic in only one way. It gives freedom to the experienced driver to modulate the pedal clutch for performing highly precision maneuvers such as constantly sliding their car, for miles. But I have yet to see a European driver driving like that on a public road. They respect traffic laws. They just love driving fast but at the same time trying to keep their cars as planted as possible. Therefore manual gearbox is a useless gearbox that does not suit modern times at all. But it is the effective brainwashing propaganda by european automakers, having persuaded "unaware" consumers for the opposite. Automatics are also marked by a factor of luxury, due to their silk- refined function over manuals and they also offer the hassle-free bonus driving at 90% of the driving time (when there is traffic, or roads are dangerous for fast driving due to pedestrians walking by side etc). I hope I gave enough explanation solving any inconvenience / misunderstanding. Have a good time and peace to everybody.
 
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Joaquin Ruhi

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Lexus continues to trademark the UX nameplate around the world, with the UX 200, UX 250, and UX 250h now registered in Europe
The 3 trademarks have been filed in the United States as well. I wrote about that, with some additional engine commentary, in this Kaizen Factor story: http://kaizen-factor.com/toyota-trademarks-trio-uxs-lexus/

I bet UX200 is going to be sold with the same engine as the NX200. The 3ZR-FAE, 2.0 litre, port injection, valvematic with 150hp/195Nm.
Probably, if the Lexus UX is to be closer to Toyota C-HR engine-wise, as is the case with ES/Avalon, RX/Highlander and LX/U.S. Land Cruiser. If, on the other hand, there is to be more Lexus vs Toyota powertrain differentiation, as in NX vs RAV4 and GX vs 4Runner, then I'll agree with Krew's prediction of a de facto 6AR-FSE (which may bear a different engine code). My article linked above addresses this in a little more detail, as well as discussing the two different Toyota 2-liter 4-cylinder engine families.
 
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Thanks!



It does seem like a stretch to have a 2.0L hybrid between the 1.8 and 2.5, but it does beg the question -- wouldn't a UX 300h be more impressive sounding than a UX 250h? Would it really just be to prevent cannibalization of the NX 300h?
I guess so. In Europe in this Segment it is negative to have too large a number. The small crossover Segment is to be fuel and cost efficient. Having a 300 nameplate would indicate an expensive and large engine. You can't sell it here with the hint to a three litre engine. Even 250 seems a bit large.

All the others have engines ranging from 1,2 to 1,8 litres with countless turbochargers attached. Not that i like it, but it is the way it is.
 
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The 3 trademarks have been filed in the United States as well. I wrote about that, with some additional engine commentary, in this Kaizen Factor story: http://kaizen-factor.com/toyota-trademarks-trio-uxs-lexus/



Probably, if the Lexus UX is to be closer to Toyota C-HR engine-wise, as is the case with ES/Avalon, RX/Highlander and LX/U.S. Land Cruiser. If, on the other hand, there is to be more Lexus vs Toyota powertrain differentiation, as in NX vs RAV4 and GX vs 4Runner, then I'll agree with Krew's prediction of a de facto 6AR-FSE (which may bear a different engine code). My article linked above addresses this in a little more detail, as well as discussing the two different Toyota 2-liter 4-cylinder engine families.
There is not that much powertrain Differentiation in RAV/NX than you might think. In Europe there is one NA Option for both the NX and the RA. The 3ZR-FAE 2,0 litre valvematic. And that is the one that will bei in the UX. In some markets the C-HR will also get the 2.0 Valvematic. It was in some press-release.
 

Joaquin Ruhi

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There is not that much powertrain Differentiation in RAV/NX than you might think. In Europe there is one NA Option for both the NX and the RA. The 3ZR-FAE 2,0 litre valvematic. And that is the one that will be in the UX. In some markets the C-HR will also get the 2.0 Valvematic. It was in some press-release.
You are absolutely, totally, 1000% correct.

I knew beforehand that European RAV4s offer a 2-liter gasoline engine, and was also aware of a number of eastern European markets (primarily Russia) offering a naturally-aspirated NX 200, but totally overlooked and forgot this fact when I wrote the article, seeing things from a narrowly North American perspective. Thanks for pointing it out and setting me straight.

The 2 official Toyota sources I've read (a news release appearing in several of their Newsrooms and the consumer CH-R Japanese microsite) mention a 2-liter option but not Valvematic per se. The specs in the latter, however, tacitly confirm that it is, indeed, the 3ZR-FAE Valvematic.
 
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