More on Lexus Visit to the Consumer Reports Test Track


Lexus GX 460

The Wall Street Journal has followed up on Toyota’s visit to the Consumer Reports test track:

…engineers went to Consumer Reports testing track in Connecticut to try to see what the magazine’s auto engineers had found.

Unfortunately, it was a rainy day, canceling the opportunity for testing. In addition, the Consumer Reports tester informed the Toyota team that he had been instructed not to test the vehicle with the Toyota staff, according to Lexus spokesperson Bill Kwong. Instead, the magazine provided a video of the testing.

Toyota had to resort to grabbing satellite images of the magazine’s testing track off Google Maps, Kwong said. Based on those images, Toyota determined the turning radius of the track was tighter than Toyota’s, which complies with federal regulations.

[Source: Wall Street Journal]

Comments


Comments


  1. CR are being a bunch of a$$es

  2. dang
    I was scared for a second when I misread the article and thought Toyota used live satellite imaging to see the vehicle in testing.

    Seriously though, Lexus should really speak out as soon as possible. They demanded ABC an official apology for some of the misinformation, but I never heard any followup. That’s just gonna kill Toyota because a lot of the average Americans still think Toyotas kill for the (supposedly) wrong reasons.

  3. WorldofLuxury:dang
    I was scared for a second when I misread the article and thought Toyota used live satellite imaging to see the vehicle in testing.

    They may spend more on R&D than any other automaker but spy satellites are beyond their capability methinks. wink

    Yes they do remain independent but I think CR would want to provide accurate test info to manufacturers so they can make their vehicles comply with their safety standards.  Not letting them see the test in person is a bit like the ABC thing, although at least CR invited them to the track.

    Edit: similar story: http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/consumer-reports-declines-toyotas-request-to-use-its-test-track/?src=mv

    Mr. Kwong said as soon as the magazine's concern became clear Toyota officials called Japan and woke up the GX 460's chief engineer. As of Wednesday, Mr. Kwong said it wasn't clear whether the slide had been reproduced.

    If the problem is duplicated, the engineers will then check the tires and suspension, as well as the electronic stability control, to see if acts quickly enough, he said.