Third Generation Toyota Tundra Master Thread

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I really hope the tundra continues with a V8. 450 plus hp will be fine. 10 speed auto. Over 20 miles on the highway will be nice.
 
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I'm not sure how much of this I should really believe. I do believe a hybrid will be an option as well as multiple powertrain options, turbocharging is a maybe. I don't think they would have specific numbers like this that just average people at the plant would know either. Secondly, 30 mpg seems like a pipe dream. If it gets that then that's awesome but wouldn't that steal a lot of sales from Tacoma? Tacoma is there bread and butter so building a half ton that would rob it of its midsize truck crown seems a little odd. We will see though. Really hoping it debuts as a 2021 model year and is shown at one of the auto shows this coming winter. Time will tell.
 
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ssun30

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30MPG is indeed questionable considering the same powertrain with a less hungry ICE only managed 28MPG on the much sleeker and lighter LC500h.
 

maiaramdan

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Which if true will ignite the question of "why they didn't put it in the LS!!!"

But how knows , maybe they finished it after the LS design was completed
 

Gecko

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A new Toyota Tundra is around the corner, and our spy shooters think they caught a hybrid model out testing. We previously wrote about a rumor that the truck would get a hybrid powertrain, but there was no evidence of it at that point. Now, we feel a bit more confident that Toyota is at least testing the Tundra with a hybrid powertrain.

The photographers say they heard the hum of the electrics, followed by the noise of an engine kicking on around 25-30 mph on multiple occasions while tailing the truck seen here. Our previous story speculated that Toyota could use a hybridized version of the 3.5-liter twin-turbo V6 we saw make its debut in the Lexus LS500. Another possible powertrain option could also be borrowed from the LS500h. That one uses a naturally aspirated V6 and an electric motor for a total system output of 354 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque. If it's the former, we'll expect significantly more power, with the powertrain likely being considered for a flagship version of the truck. Our guess would put a hybridized version of the twin-turbo V6 at about 450-500 horsepower.

This particular tester doesn't look like a "flagship" truck with the small, steel wheels, but who knows what Toyota is up to with its test vehicle. Physical details of the Tundra mule we see here are similar to the previous set of photos we got. Toyota is still trying extra hard to make sure we can't see what's going on with the rear suspension, implementing all sorts of brushes and blockers. Everything rear of the cab is kept tightly under wraps, and the front end gets the same treatment. None of the lights appear to be production units at this point, but they're covered up nonetheless.

A previous report told us that the new Tundra and Tacoma would share a platform internally called F1. We expect the first truck on this platform to be revealed in 2020, so that tells us we'll see the new Tundra next year sometime — the Tacoma likely still has a bit of a wait until its next overhaul. Hybridization, with still unknown amounts of power, will likely be along for the ride when the truck is finally shown.

Source and more pics: https://www.autoblog.com/2019/06/11/2021-toyota-tundra-hybrid-spy-photos/

Toyota wants to make sure that people don't see what the back half of this thing looks like underneath - axles, packaging, etc.
 

Will1991

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If a Thundra gets a TT V6 Hybrid option before a LS or LC... Something is really wrong within Lexus and someone should be fired...
 

maiaramdan

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It won't get it before LS or LC Tundra appearance will be end of 20 or beginning of 21 which by time maybe able to see LC or LS facelift or maybe even both within Tokyo show this year to Tokyo Olympics next year
 
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A lot of speculative articles recently about the Tundra and Land Cruiser dropping V8s for TTV6s. I admit, this engine will likely be an option, but have we all forgotten about the 2 larger displacement engines in the diagram? Those have to come in somewhere. Sure, we still have the Sequoia, but I guarantee Toyota won't make a larger displacement engine to only be used in one vehicle.
 
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I agree, no way would Toyota, or any manufacturer mass produce an engine for one model. It wouldn't be an efficient or profitable business move. A lot of rumors flying right now but I hope Toyota doesn't get "carried away" with this redo. Mike Sweers made mention that auto manufacturers are "solving problems that don't exist" (referring to pro trailer back up assist and things like that) so it keeps me hopeful that the truck wont get over done with useless or problematic systems.
 

maiaramdan

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Game changer!

I am start to be afraid little bit now, but we have to wait and see

Game changer for me means that Toyota will compete with Rivian r1s & r1t for the next Sequoia & Tundra
 
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ssun30

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With that weak NA 3.5L V6 the multistage already has comparable torque to the 5.0L V8 (~500N.m). In lower gears it's so strong it could keep up with the V8 up until 80km/h while being 110hp down and 100kg heavier.

Even without more powerful motors and batteries the powertrain will have around 750N.m of combined torque. That's 100N.m more than their own 1VD and most competition. With proper gearing this thing could really make all light-duty diesel trucks look weak. But it won't be in Cummins territory.
 

Carmaker1

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I REALLY didn't want to comment on this, but yes this is definitely true (found out in the summer) and definitely not a 2021 model anymore. The August 2020 date was once accurate indeed (never 2016-19) but things do change due to unforeseen circumstances while in development or due to market forces.

The biggest problem I've always had with this kind of delay happening-which is not surprising- is the MASSIVE domino effect it has on other vehicles utilising TNGA-F.
I am very confident at this point that between the midsize suvs and the IMV/Tacoma pick up redesigns, it is up to Toyota which they want to be launched first.

But definitely set in stone for 2021 is the 2022 Tundra being released around October 2021. Studying the G A-L rollout in terms of production dates between March 2017 for the LC 500 and December 2017 for the LS, such spacing is very likely between the next Tundra and Land Cruiser 300.

An August 2021 start of production date for the next Tundra would mean that a 2023 Land Cruiser and 2023 LX would be very, very likely and is probably fact (barring random ass changes) and not enter production until 8-10 months minimum after the Tundra. A 2023 Sequoia is a given, during 2022 as well, after those 3.

Well...since you now have 2022 so BUSY (including non-GA-F vehicles), this means everything else GA-F must be done in the 2023 calendar year and then if that year gets clogged with 3 BOF redesigns, what the heck happens then to the 3 remaining archaic BOF vehicles?

Pushed into the year 2024 of course. And I don't mean model years, I mean CY 2024, 5 YEARS from now!

The midsize suvs are not coming until 2023 as 2024 models (4R/PR/GX) or that will be swapped out with Taco/Fort/Hilux (MY 2025) for 2024 as MY 2025s. 2021-22 is the all jumbo Yotas. Nada for MY 2021 I can expect.

Many people may not agree with me but I am certain that 5-6 years ago, Toyota was in the early stages of working on a next generation Land Cruiser and such a vehicle would have arrived by now or next year. Both Tundra and Land Cruiser have their own delays, which in regard to the former, could have been avoided by getting it into the development sooner than they did in 2015.

There's been an annoyingly cynical approach to the existing product line which don't receive the necessary major updates needed to tide them along as stop-gaps or keep them fresh and competitive in the marketplace.

What does annoy me even more, is when constructive criticism is made (via feasible suggestions), some apologists (not necessarily on LE) tend to play Devil's advocate and gaslight or shut down the valid concerns. (ie "if it ain't broke don't fix it..."; "happy, 'cuz don't want my xxx to become dated"; "you should be happy that"...)

I know that this company can and will deliver excellent product that customers can continue to rely on, but I can see as an outsider with an ear on the inside at times, that someone greenlighted a program too late (*coughs* new Tundra) and when they do run into delays it becomes a clusterf*ck, because you're replacing relics or near-relics.

The idea that Toyota only maintains reliability somehow by keeping things forever (and therefore not make need changes is a myth, chosen to be bandied about by the ignorant or wilfully obtuse.)

Japanese being leaders in tech and mechanical engineering for durability has proven that wrong when they were able to launch new products efficiently in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, while making revolutionary products and sticking to a timely model cadence. The Tundra is going to be 15 years old by the time it is redesigned. Same for the LX and LC, ditto for the Sequoia as well.

I do not recall seeing these problems with the previous generations of these models nor their little brothers or junior Lexus cousins of yore. 7-9 years at most or even less. Someone got cocky with their customer base and then when they got to doing stuff with big ideas on top of that, all of a sudden they don't have enough time to fall back on (*coughs* Tundra). Particularly with a revolutionary hybrid needing finessing.

Time doesn't wait for anyone, as seen with the RC that should've been here in the late 90s or early-mid 2000s. Not 10-15 years later, when coupes are sinking and BMW had 4 generations of compact coupes (E30 3-Series Coupe of 1982 was a 2 door sedan essentially, unlike E36 3-C of 1992+ and E46-C 1999+) to secure their place amongst the nouveau riche, yuppies, and heirs of the world.

It would be nothing short of a miracle for Toyota to redesign 4 to 5 vehicles to GA-F per 9-12 months. But nobody has managed to do that in the industry, so things are going to be stretched out as I thought. Why do I say that? Study the rollouts of TNGA-C from 2015-Present, GA-L & TNGA-K 2017-present, and TNGA-N 2018 to present.

All of these new applications for Toyota New Global architecture have understandably not happened in one fell swoop. They are staggered out by many months, if and when differing variations (M-S Camry-Jun 2017 vs F-S Avalon-Q2 2018 vs Compact CUV RAV4-Nov 2018 vs larger Highlander - Nov 19) and that concerns me.

I think the best thing that Toyota could do is to launch 2-3 GA-F models within 24 months, starting in 2021 for 2022 to hurry replacements, but that won't happen judging by how things went in 2006 and 2007. A Tundra by itself in 2021, then 3 new big SUVs in 2022 is most likely.
 
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I REALLY didn't want to comment on this, but yes this is definitely true (found out in the summer) and definitely not a 2021 model anymore. The August 2020 date was once accurate indeed (never 2016-19) but things do change due to unforeseen circumstances while in development or due to market forces.

The biggest problem I've always had with this kind of delay happening-which is not surprising- is the MASSIVE domino effect it has on other vehicles utilising TNGA-F.
I am very confident at this point that between the midsize suvs and the IMV/Tacoma pick up redesigns, it is up to Toyota which they want to be launched first.

But definitely set in stone is the 2022 Tundra being released around October 2021. Studying the G A-L rollout in terms of production dates between March 2017 for the LC 500 and December 2017 for the LS, such spacing is very likely between the next Tundra and Land Cruiser 300.

An August 2021 start of production date for the next Tundra would mean that a 2023 Land Cruiser and 2023 LX would be very, very likely and is probably fact (barring random ass changes) and not enter production until 8-10 months minimum after the Tundra. A 2023 Sequoia is a given, during 2022 as well, after those 3.

Well since you now have 2022 so BUSY (including non-GA-F vehicles), this means everything else GA-F must be done in the 2023 calendar year and then if that year gets clogged with 3 BOF redesigns, what the heck happens then to the 3 remaining archaic BOF vehicles? Pushed into the year 2024 of course. And I don't mean model years, I mean CY 2024, 5 YEARS from now!

The midsize suvs are not coming until 2023 as 2024 models (4R/PR/GX) or that will be swapped out with Taco/Fort/Hilux (MY 2025) for 2024 as MY 2025s. 2021-22 is the all jumbo Yotas. Nada for MY 2021.

Many people may not agree with me but I am certain that 5-6 years ago, Toyota was in the early stages of working on a next generation Land Cruiser and such a vehicle would have arrived by now or next year. Both Tundra and Land Cruiser have their own delays, which in regard to the former, could have been avoided by getting into the development sooner than they did.

There's been an annoyingly cynical approach to the existing product line which don't receive the necessary major updates needed to tide them along as stop-gaps and keep them fresh and competitive in the marketplace.

What does annoy me even more, is when constructive criticism is made (via feasible suggestions), some apologists (not necessarily on LE) tend to play Devil's advocate and gaslight or shut down the valid concerns. (ie if ain't broke don't fix lt; happy because don't want my xxx to become dated; you should be happy that...)

I know that this company can and will deliver excellent product that customers can continue to rely on, but I can see as an outsider with an ear on the inside at times, that someone greenlighted a program too late and when they do run into delays it becomes a clusterf*ck, because you're replacing relics or near-relics.

The idea that Toyota only maintains reliability somehow by keeping things forever (and therefore not make need changes is a myth, chosen to be bandied about by the ignorant or wilfully obtuse.

Japanese being leaders in tech and mechanical engineering for durability has proven that wrong when they were able to launch new products efficiently in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, while making sticking to a timely model cadence. The Tundra is going to be 15 years old by the time it is redesigned. Same for the LX and LC, ditto for the Sequoia as well.

I do not recall seeing these problems with the previous generations of these models nor their little brothers or junior Lexus cousins of yore. 7-9 years at most or even less. Someone got cocky and when they got to doing stuff with big ideas on top of that, all of a sudden they don't have enough time to fall back on. Particularly with a revolutionary hybrid needing finessing.

Time doesn't wait for anyone, as seen with the RC that should've been here in the late 90s or early-mid 2000s. Not 10-15 years later, when coupes are sinking and BMW had 4 generations of coupes (E30 was a 2 door sedan essentially, unlike E36) to secure their place amongst the nouveau riche yuppies and heirs of the world.

It would be nothing short of a miracle for Toyota to redesign 4 to 5 vehicles to GA-F per 9-12 months. But nobody has managed to do that, so things are going to be stretched out as I thought.
Lots of info here. So, just for clarification; when you say "this is definitely true", are you referring the the fact that the Tundra redesign will be a 2022 MY? Or about the 3.5L powertrain? Any new news on powertrains? V8s?
 

krew

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There's been an annoyingly cynical approach to the existing product line which don't receive the necessary major updates needed to tide them along as stop-gaps and keep them fresh and competitive in the marketplace.

I know that this company can and will deliver excellent product that customers can continue to rely on, but I can see as an outsider with an ear on the inside at times, that someone greenlighted a program too late and when they do run into delays it becomes a clusterf*ck, because you're replacing relics or near-relics.
While there are definitely multiple issues with the new LS, keeping the old model around for over a decade and inflating expectations to astronomic proportions really hurt any positive momentum. There was no way the new model was going to be able to survive the ridiculous buildup.
 
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