The Gazoo Racing Super Sport WEC hypercar thread

ssun30

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HOLY F*CK!! 3.5 LITERS?!?!?!?!?! THAT'S HUUUGE.

LMFAOOOOO Toyota is going to easily dominate the next couple of years with that engine being so stupidly under-stressed. Good luck everybody else! That's 1.1L bigger than the old engine. Just to remind everyone, the old engine was stout as f*ck.

My question to them is, why didn't they carry over the 2.4L twin-turbocharged V6? This makes no sense to me. What will happen to the GR Super Sport road car? Will it have the new engine or the old one? The concept car had the old engine, but did the car that we saw last September at Le Mans have the new engine? I'm truly perplexed and I am dying to know more. This engine is now bigger than their 3.4L NA V8 from the TS040 and is smaller than their 3.7L NA V8 from the TS030. Like I said before, the GR010 is going to tear the competition's asses so hard and wide they're going to shriek like a banshee. Granted the ACO are going to nerf the crap out of this car via BoP. I'd be so triggered if they put success ballasts on the car.

Oooh I am so excited.
Here's why they upsized the ICE from my understanding:

The goal of the LMH rule is reducing cost by make the hybrid system simpler. In the 2016 and 2017 season the hybrid development war became unsustainable. The reason is under LMP1-H rule, hybrid makes up 50% of the total power (500PS out of 1000PS). Because chassis and ICE development was limited, almost all performance gains are from the hybrid system. That's how we got to the ridiculously complex 3-motor hybrid systems on the 919/TS050.

Under LMH there is only one MGU-K on the front axle. In a straight line it's better to shift power to the rear axle where there's more downforce and traction. But since there's no MGU-K in the rear, the ICE has to do a lot more work. The new 3.5L unit is 36% more powerful than the 2.4L. If they stuck with the 2.4L, they either lose performance or risk degrading reliability because now the ICE is more stressed. They were following the golden rule: there's no replacement for displacement.

One more thing to consider is that total hybrid deployment is also reduced, along with the weight increase. So the LMH cars will run out of energy allowance much quicker than LMP1-H cars. If you look at LMP1-H onboards, the cars lose so much power when they run out of allowance that they actually lose speed on straights. This will be significantly worse in LMH. Therefore they went for a much more powerful ICE to make up for the difference.

What's interesting is that LMH cars will likely be faster than LMP1-H on straights because they have a 160hp advantage. The LMP1-H will be a lot faster in corners due to more downforce/less weight/less restrictive hybrid deployment. I like the direction they are going with LMH but I think the power limit is too punishing. The originally planned 750PS should be better.
 
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Here's why they upsized the ICE from my understanding:

The goal of the LMH rule is reducing cost by make the hybrid system simpler. In the 2016 and 2017 season the hybrid development war became unsustainable. The reason is under LMP1-H rule, hybrid makes up 50% of the total power (500PS out of 1000PS). Because chassis and ICE development was limited, almost all performance gains are from the hybrid system. That's how we got to the ridiculously complex 3-motor hybrid systems on the 919/TS050.

Under LMH there is only one MGU-K on the front axle. In a straight line it's better to shift power to the rear axle where there's more downforce and traction. But since there's no MGU-K in the rear, the ICE has to do a lot more work. The new 3.5L unit is 36% more powerful than the 2.4L. If they stuck with the 2.4L, they either lose performance or risk degrading reliability because now the ICE is more stressed. They were following the golden rule: there's no replacement for displacement.

One more thing to consider is that total hybrid deployment is also reduced, along with the weight increase. So the LMH cars will run out of energy allowance much quicker than LMP1-H cars. If you look at LMP1-H onboards, the cars lose so much power when they run out of allowance that they actually lose speed on straights. This will be significantly worse in LMH. Therefore they went for a much more powerful ICE to make up for the difference.

What's interesting is that LMH cars will likely be faster than LMP1-H on straights because they have a 160hp advantage. The LMP1-H will be a lot faster in corners due to more downforce/less weight/less restrictive hybrid deployment. I like the direction they are going with LMH but I think the power limit is too punishing. The originally planned 750PS should be better.
Makes total and absolute sense. There seems to always be a trend of fluctuating regulations where there are times where the racing product is prioritized, then there are other times where the pursuit in technological superiority is valued. We've have gone from the latter to the former with the introduction of the hypercar rules, but I genuinely wouldn't be surprised if we revert back to pushing the barriers of alternative fuels and powerplant technologies in the next set of regulations. Before LMP1, we had the GT1 class, where again, the racing product was put first.

Come to think of it, we really wouldn't have the hypercar regulations today had VW not sh*t the bed with dieselgate. We had Toyota, Porsche, Audi, and at one point we also had Peugeot and Nissan fighting for glory. It seemed to be an excellent formula, but it was too high-risk, high-reward it seems.

I appreciate now that we have smaller companies and privateers trying to reach the top step of Le Mans and kudos to Toyota for supporting the series through thick and thin. Without Toyota the top flight of endurance racing would've been on life-support or dare I say dead.
 
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Idk about the LC-F, but the next A100 Supra is rumored to to be a turbo V6 hybrid.
I'm really hoping the BMW powerplant gets repurposed even more into a Toyota plant and they can use that as a shortcut into having their own inline-six engine again. We could call it something like, the G30E-GTS.
 

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Toyota is going to pull an Audi in upcoming LM races. Going against no one and stacking trophies until Peugeot shows up on the grid eventually. LMP1s were unsustainable and fast as hell (faster than F1 in the corners) but these new regs are a fail so far. AMOCO has failed big time in trying to attract manufacturers to join Toyota.
 
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Toyota is going to pull an Audi in upcoming LM races. Going against no one and stacking trophies until Peugeot shows up on the grid eventually. LMP1s were unsustainable and fast as hell (faster than F1 in the corners) but these new regs are a fail so far. AMOCO has failed big time in trying to attract manufacturers to join Toyota.
Well it was going to be a thing had the ACO not f*ck sh*t up and allow LMDh cars from IMSA join. Aston Martin left because of F1 but you had Porsche and Audi doing some feasibility studies and McLaren were certainly interested as well for hypercars. I wouldn't be surprised if Aston Martin returns once they sort everything out financially.

Now that LMDh cars are coming you have the following manufacturers/privateers: Toyota, Glickenhaus, Alpine, ByKolles, Peugeot, Cadillac, Acura, Mazda, Porsche, Audi, and we may have Lexus and Hyundai joining along as well. We don't know if guys like McLaren or Ferrari will join though.
 
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