Lexus RC F: First GenerationUSA

Lexus RC F Track Edition Priced at $96,650 in USA

Lexus RC F Track Edition Pricing

Lexus USA has announced that the RC F Track Edition will start at $96,650 and will be limited to 50 units country-wide for the 2020 model year.

This $32,000 upgrade over the standard RC F adds a number of features to the coupe, including a carbon fiber hood, roof, and rear wing, reduced weight, Brembo carbon ceramic brakes, 19-inch BBS forged alloy wheels and a titanium exhaust.

(The starting price for the standard 2020 RC F was also announced at $64,750 USD.)

Comments
RCF and RCF Track Edition premiere at the Laguna Seca Track.

Excited about the tires and my big issue of soft sidewalls is addressed by these new RCF-spec Michelin Pilot Sport 4S tires

Faisal Sheikh
RCF and RCF Track Edition premiere at the Laguna Seca Track.

Excited about the tires and my big issue of soft sidewalls is addressed by these new RCF-spec Michelin Pilot Sport 4S tires

The Lexus RCF is a great car. Would like to see the track edition offer with the ultra sonic blue with red interior in the future. I hope Lexus Is at making the next generation even better. Hoping for a dynamic force engine Tt V8 with 500 plus hp for the next generation RCF replacement.
  • Joe
    Joe
  • March 28, 2019
flexus
RC-F discontinued in Finland. Or just maybe they are waiting to get WLTP emission measurement. The main point is that it's not anymore on the website. It could come back since the standard RC is showing the old model's picture, but I highly doubt since it costs over 140000€ and Lexus hasn't sold even a single unit. It's not that people don't buy it because it's expensive since LC hybrid has seen 6 units sold, which is quite good for a country of 5 million inhabitants and bad roads. Taxation is just too high for 5.0 V8.
Same decision is made to delete the RC F from the range in Belgium & Luxemburg, unfortunately. :mad:
It's a shame, because such 'halo' models are absolutely needed to build brand awareness with a dream factor, even if not one single unit is sold...
Joe
Same decision is made to delete the RC F from the range in Belgium & Luxemburg, unfortunately. :mad:
It's a shame, because such 'halo' models are absolutely needed to build brand awareness with a dream factor, even if not one single unit is sold...
I think they dropped because it was keeping fleet emissions high. But I don't think they never intented to sell one. As you said building a brand, never saw even displayed.
interesting that they say nothing about the lap time at laguna seca. It's a nice car, very comfortable, but it does not compete with the other cars one typically sees at the track, like a corvette grand sport, porsche 911 S or GT3 and above, camaro Zl1 1LE; not sure if it would be a modified miata either. Not that speed is the important thing for the RC F track edition; just sayin
PeterF
interesting that they say nothing about the lap time at laguna seca. It's a nice car, very comfortable, but it does not compete with the other cars one typically sees at the track, like a corvette grand sport, porsche 911 S or GT3 and above, camaro Zl1 1LE; not sure if it would be a modified miata either. Not that speed is the important thing for the RC F track edition; just sayin
When was the last time Lexus talked about lap times? The track edition will not compete with most of the cars you mentioned. An M4 CS, Camaro 1LE SS or GT350R most likely, but these cars have racing slick tires that make a big difference in lap times. A standard RCF without carbon/TVD, with Randy having issues with the transmission, ran a 1:43. It is safe to say the RCF track edition will be 2.5 - 3 seconds quicker than the RCF carbon with TVD so it should put it in the 1:39 range with Randy, wbich is a very good lap considering it is not on slick tires and still has a full luxury interior.

p.s. Unless a Miata has a big turbo on its engine, it would not be close to an RCF on a big/fast momentum and flow track where you are carrying around 90 - 100 mph through some turns.
Faisal Sheikh
When was the last time Lexus talked about lap times? The track edition will not compete with most of the cars you mentioned. An M4 CS, Camaro 1LE SS or GT350R most likely, but these cars have racing slick tires that make a big difference in lap times. A standard RCF without carbon/TVD, with Randy having issues with the transmission, ran a 1:43. It is safe to say the RCF track edition will be 2.5 - 3 seconds quicker than the RCF carbon with TVD so it should put it in the 1:39 range with Randy, wbich is a very good lap considering it is not on slick tires and still has a full luxury interior.

p.s. Unless a Miata has a big turbo on its engine, it would not be close to an RCF on a big/fast momentum and flow track where you are carrying around 90 - 100 mph through some turns.
I agree, The RC F is a luxury grand touring car, not a car that will compete with the typical cars one sees on the track (in USA at High Performance track days) that I mentioned above. So, IDK why Lexus calls it a track edition, inferring that it will compete at the track. I was expecting a serious attempt by Lexus to field a car that would compete with vette GS, 911S, GTS. I was disappointed. I might have bought one if they took off more weight and if it was faster. Its still a cool car. I am sure people will buy it, but for the most part they won't drive it on a track. The wing looks cool and it's comfy, but still heavy. I am sorry to ding it, but I was disappointed. 0-60 in 3.96 s is pretty good and it is an improvement, but I was hoping for something quicker.. There are many cars that are much faster. Their RC F GT concept car was very fast on VIR. They can make a fast car, but their market is not to track boys; its to more sophisticated drivers who like a pretty fast car that has some cool carbon fiber and has a cool wing. I do like the way it looks. I am just complaining and don't mean to disrespect the car. I just wish they sold something more track focused. I guess one could buy one, and pull out the back seats, and do away with a lot of the extra stuff to make it lighter.
The RCF GT that ran lightning lap was not street legal and was stripped out of all interior. The track edition RCF still has the same rear seats and front seats my RCF has because racing seats are uncomfortable for daily driving. I think you are confusing the car's purpose. It is not a purpose built track car. 911s cost a lot more than the RCF and Corvette is a 2-seater. If you want to compare it, you should look at 2 + 2 cars that are built with track focus while still retaining the luxury amenities. Cars like (past) C63 AMG black series, (past) M3 GTS, M4 CS or GTS, GT350R are a good comparison.

I personally thought, Lexus would strip out the rear seats and put lightweight racing seats at the front, but they have been using the phrase "drive it every day and then take it to the track to run fast laps". Still, just under 200 lbs weight savings is quite impressive and I think it will do quite well.


PeterF
I agree, The RC F is a luxury grand touring car, not a car that will compete with the typical cars one sees on the track (in USA at High Performance track days) that I mentioned above. So, IDK why Lexus calls it a track edition, inferring that it will compete at the track. I was expecting a serious attempt by Lexus to field a car that would compete with vette GS, 911S, GTS. I was disappointed. I might have bought one if they took off more weight and if it was faster. Its still a cool car. I am sure people will buy it, but for the most part they won't drive it on a track. The wing looks cool and it's comfy, but still heavy. I am sorry to ding it, but I was disappointed. 0-60 in 3.96 s is pretty good and it is an improvement, but I was hoping for something quicker.. There are many cars that are much faster. Their RC F GT concept car was very fast on VIR. They can make a fast car, but their market is not to track boys; its to more sophisticated drivers who like a pretty fast car that has some cool carbon fiber and has a cool wing. I do like the way it looks. I am just complaining and don't mean to disrespect the car. I just wish they sold something more track focused. I guess one could buy one, and pull out the back seats, and do away with a lot of the extra stuff to make it lighter.
Ha! Really cool seeing Chad in the video. I know Chad, he's a really good guy and a true Lexus enthusiast!
New Lexus marketing of the RCF



Not really a huge fan of these commercials, but the car looks and sounds great :heart_eyes:
2020 Lexus RC F Track Edition First Drive Review- Not the hardcore machine we deserve
The Track Edition comes off as a glorified $32,000 Sport Package

THERMAL, Calif. — It's been more than 10 years since Lexus launched its high-performance F models. Ten years. After a full decade you'd think Toyota's luxury division would have it figured out by now, but the 2020 Lexus RC F Track Edition isn't the hardcore machine we were hoping for.

Maybe our expectations were too high. We saw its lackluster specs at the Detroit Auto Show in January, but you just never know until you get behind the wheel. And while there's a lot to like here — this is the most powerful and track-capable Lexus since the LFA supercar was launched in 2011 — it's quickly apparent that Lexus' engineers were held back from making the RC F Track Edition what they wanted to make.

The RC F Track Edition uses the same naturally aspirated 5.0-liter V8 (2UR-GSE) that powered the IS F sedan in 2008 and the standard RC F since 2015. It's the engine Lexus also uses in the LC 500 coupe and the GS F sedan. The company's strict warrantability standards mean this engine is limited to 500 hp, said Yuuichi Tsurumoto, the chief engineer on the RC F Track Edition and the man responsible for all Lexus F models. So supercharging the engine was out of the question. Increasing the V8's displacement to 5.5-liters or more was explored, but then the RC F Track Edition would have been subject to a gas guzzler tax, and that too was deemed unacceptable. The frustration in Tsurumoto's voice was clear.

And while the 5.0-liter's output has been increased slightly for 2020, up to 472 horsepower (+5) at 7,100 rpm and 395 pound-feet of torque (+6) at 4,800 rpm, the RC F Track Edition doesn't get any more power than the standard RC F. Both versions of the coupe also continue to use an Aisin-supplied eight-speed automatic, which is essentially unchanged.

Lexus is only going to build "around 400" RC F Track Editions, and it will import just 50 into the United States. That's all. Just 50 cars. And they're going to cost $97,675 including a $1,025 destination fee. Who cares about a gas guzzler tax on such an extreme limited run of a $100,000 factory hot rod?

In the age of 797-hp Redeyes and 640-hp Cadillacs, the 472-hp RC F Track Edition may not sound like it would be quick, but it is. With its new launch control and shorter 3.13:1 rear-end ratio, Lexus says it can sprint to 60 mph in 3.97 seconds. That's just a tenth or two off the performance of the LFA. Unfortunately, it's also only two tenths quicker than the standard RC F, which Lexus says now hits 60 mph in 4.2 seconds.

Launch control is available only in Sport+ mode. The system is activated with a button marked "Launch" on the coupe's console, and it allows you to rev the engine to just 1,800 rpm, which is lower than many similar systems out there. Tsurumoto says that's where the V8 makes 150 lb-ft of torque, which is all the rear tires can handle without going up in smoke.

Honestly, it's more fun to forget about the launch control, shut off the traction control and blaze the coupe's 19-inch Michelins through first and some of second gear. Although that will get very expensive very quickly. Lexus worked with Michelin for a special version of its Pilot Sport 4 S tire. They're sized 255/35R19 in front and 275/35R19 in the rear, and the standard RC F get them too.

Michelin's stickier Sport Cup 2 would certainly add grip, but those tires don't perform well in wet weather, and Tsurumoto was asked to build the ultimate daily driver than can be tracked on the weekends. He recommends buyers get a stickier set of rubber mounted on an extra set of wheels for track days.

Lexus uses very little aluminum in the RC F's chassis and structure, and as a result, it has long been criticized for being obese compared to its German competition. For 2020, the standard RC F drops about 55 pounds, and the Track Edition, which gets a carbon fiber roof and hood, drops another 122 pounds. On the track, it does feel lighter and more tossable, but don't get too excited: At 3,781 pounds, the Track Edition is still a porker.

The majority of the weight savings are from the Track Edition's Brembo carbon ceramic brake rotors. They shave 48.5 pounds from the car and work with six-piston Brembo calipers in the front. They also perform considerably better and with more consistency on the track than the steel units on the standard RC F. Pedal feel and modulation are excellent, and heat soak isn't a problem on the Thermal Club's 1.8-mile circuit, which is notoriously hard on brakes.

Other weight savings are less significant. The carbon fiber roof and hood save about 20 pounds. Replacing the RC F's retractable rear spoiler with a fixed carbon fiber rear wing increases downforce and saves 6.4 pounds. The Track Edition's forged BBS wheels are each 1.5 pounds lighter than the standard car's wheels. A lighter rear bumper saves 1.1 pounds, and hollow half-shafts save 4 pounds without sacrificing strength. Under the hood, the Track Edition uses a smaller air conditioning compressor, new aluminum spring support brackets, and shaves 1.5 pounds of excess aluminum from the underside of the intake manifold.

A further 15 pounds is saved by the Track Edition's titanium mufflers and connector pipes, from which the V8 thunders a very satisfying roar. The exhaust tips are stainless steel and coated in a blue finish for a unique look. In Sport+ mode, Lexus uses the audio system to manipulate and enhance that roar inside the cabin. Despite the weight reduction, the engineers swear the car's weight balance is exactly the same, with about 54 percent of the coupe's weight over its front tires.

When we ask Ysurumoto why he didn't improve that balance by moving the battery to the trunk, he laughs and says, "Very good question." Like seemingly many other elements in the RC F Track Edition, it seems his bosses wouldn't let him go far enough with that either.

It's also surprising how little the suspension has been changed on the Track Edition. The RC F's springs and sway bars were carried over untouched. The dampers were stiffened, some in the Normal setting, more in Sport+, but it isn't a radical increase in either compression or rebound. That said, on the track, the Lexus does feel tied down and secure. Mid-corner bumps and curbing don't upset its chassis. It's easy to pick your line and hold it. Although we didn't drive the car on the street, it feels like it would be a comfortable daily for an enthusiast driver.

Some other small changes were made to increase response and reduce understeer. The steering rack is mounted with 150-percent stiffer bushings that resist deflection in hard cornering, which can affect the toe of the front tires. Stiffer rear subframe bushings reduce camber angle changes of the rear wheels. The rear engine mount bushing is also stiffer.

Throttle response is sharper than before thanks to a redesigned airbox with increased flow and a smaller but less restrictive air filter. A flap in the system, which increases volume and sound, now opens at 2,800 rpm. That's 800 rpm sooner than before, although we're not sure this is relevant as many RC F owners modify the flap to stay open all of the time.

More important, the engineers have also remapped the throttle response curve to be more linear throughout the pedal stroke. It's less abrupt than before, which gives you improved predictability and more precise control.

"Controlling the vehicle with the throttle was the goal," says Tsurumoto. "We wanted to make it easier to use the throttle to control the car. It's the style of driving I prefer."

These changes have reduced understeer. The front end still pushes if you overcook a corner entry, but it's mild and should prove to be a welcome safety net on a tight mountain road. Once the front end bites and you get back to the throttle, the Track Edition can be steered with its throttle. And very precisely, thanks to a more aggressively tuned Torsen differential. Big drifts come easily. Shut off its stability control, and there's enough power to carry long, smoky, full-lock powerslides.

Overall the new RC F Track Edition is an impressive high-performance car. It's easy to drive quickly, it can handle a beating at the racetrack, and it'll make any driver smile. It's just not radical enough. It's just not the car it can be, or should be. It isn't different enough from the standard RC F to justify its Track Edition name or its considerable additional cost.

If corporate would just loosen the reigns, Tsurumoto and his team of engineers could have built something truly exclusive, something truly special. A real ultra-performance limited-edition RC F model for a select few hardcore enthusiasts, one with a special powertrain, extreme tires and even more aggressive weight savings. Instead, the RC F Track Edition comes off as a glorified $32,000 Sport Package.

It's unfortunate. Lexus can do better.
Ouch...but the commentary from Tsurumoto is interesting, seems like the bean counters pushed back against the engineers...
Caranddriver review and video as well

https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a27033751/2020-lexus-rc-f-track-edition-drive/

We have a total of nine minutes in the Lexus's new 2020 RC F Track Edition. Nine. It's not much, we'll admit. And it's certainly not enough to level a final verdict on this special model, only 50 of which will come to the United States. But it's enough to say with certainty that chief engineer Yuuichi Tsurumoto, a man with a plan, hit his target with the low-volume coupe. He wanted a car that could be controlled with the throttle. Specifically, the goal was to build a car that can be steered with the throttle. And Tsurumoto, well, he has succeeded. The 2020 RC F Track Edition speaks the language of chunked rubber and gray smoke. It paints its character in broad, black swaths at corner exit and speaks its mind through titanium mufflers. It is a driver's car in the way that only a Japanese luxury coupe can be—sharp and loud when that's what you want, yet still mighty opulent.
Tragic Bronson
2020 Lexus RC F Track Edition First Drive Review- Not the hardcore machine we deserve

Ouch...but the commentary from Tsurumoto is interesting, seems like the bean counters pushed back against the engineers...

I agree with the review. BUT, I will add: If they really wanted to put together a car with a faster and still reliable engine, then they could, but it would be much more expensive and would require a lot of development. An example is the Porsche 911 Carrera S. the 2020 911 S (and the 991.2 model) are much faster (0-60 in about 3.4; MT did it in 3.1 with the 991.2) HOWEVER, the cost is at least 33% more. If you look at the build for a 2020 911S with carbon ceramic brakes and similar tech, that car will cost about $140,000. It's an amazing car, but, its almost 50% more. Ceramic brakes in the 911 cost about an extra $9 k. Now I would not have bothered with the ceramic brakes; too expensive and if you track it, they will wear out too fast. BUT, overall, for what you get, the RC F (track edition) is an excellent car. We were expecting more, but still. BUT, if I were going to buy one, I'd get the regular RCF with the Performance package, or even just a standard RCF. 0-60 in 4.2 is fast and if one just wants a very comfortable, fast, and reliable sports car (in the category of M3 and M4), then the basic RC F is really the way to go. To save money, I'd buy a 2017 model CPO
2020 RC F: $64,750

2020 RC F Track Edition: $96,650

...that's *quite* a jump.

https://pressroom.toyota.com/releases/the-pinnacle-of-f-2020-lexus-rcf-and-rcf-track-edition.htm
Compared to RC F Track Edition: $97k

I just built a C 63S Coupe as comparably equipped as possible and it came in at $84,700.

Just build an M4 Competition comparably equipped for $75,400.

The pricing on this is clearly for the limited edition moreso than the actual upgrades.
An RCF carbon fiber/TVD in the US with all options was $80,000 MSRP. So, the jump is really around $18,000 or so, but the carbon ceramic brakes alone cost $12,000 so I am not surprised at all.
It’s a little pricey but I think it’s worth it. Limited edition. Probably one of the last few Na V8 engine cars coming out of Lexus in the next few years. I hope they offer it more color choices in the next model years. I would to see it offer in ultrasonic blue mica 2.0 or structural blue.
Gecko
Compared to RC F Track Edition: $97k

I just built a C 63S Coupe as comparably equipped as possible and it came in at $84,700.

Just build an M4 Competition comparably equipped for $75,400.

oooh, way too expensive. The M4 Competition and the C 63S,are very nice and fun cars. why buy the RC F TE? reliability? lexus lover?
RCF Track edition should be a Lexus Enthusiast's dream. Who cares about price, unless anybody here actually getting one? And at 100k, if you can afford it, you won't be asking that many questions.

Let's just enjoy the ride.
PeterF
oooh, way too expensive. The M4 Competition and the C 63S,are very nice and fun cars. why buy the RC F TE? reliability? lexus lover?
I bought an RCF Carbon/TVD over the other cars mainly because of the high-revving N/A V8 as it will no longer be available. Also, the exterior, interior, exclusivity and durability/quality are other big factors. I put on a full cat back and easily it gets just around 500 HP because of the very restrictive stock exhaust. Based on how fast it gets to redline, it is definitely much quicker.
zeusus
RCF Track edition should be a Lexus Enthusiast's dream. Who cares about price, unless anybody here actually getting one? And at 100k, if you can afford it, you won't be asking that many questions.

Let's just enjoy the ride.
We're not saying it isn't any Lexus Enthusiast's dream (I'm still not sold on the Frankenstein platform but I can try to get over that bit), but more like Lexus needs to get their act together and start building the important cars that will allow them to get more recognition. Slap in the TTV8 in an LS, then make an LS F, introduce the LQ for christ's sake, LC C, LC F, new LX, new GX, new GS, RWD ES, RX and NX, make strong mid-tier trims for those cars and bring F models as well, bring back the IS F, no more of the stupid frankenstein RC platform and make the next RC based off the IS, RC C, and add a god damn turbo to the UX. <-- Examples are right there

I realize how special this Track Edition is and I welcome it with open arms regardless of ANY flaws it could potentially have, but when you look at it in the grand scheme of things, its flaws begin to show. It's a bit pricey, now yes, the M4 GTS is so much more expensive than the regular M4, and the upgrades aren't even worth the cost. The Lexus is actually better than the M4 GTS in that regard. But Lexus' core competencies aren't to make things super expensive and while still a very good product, there could be some question marks. I'd rather get me a LC at this price point and snap everyones necks in either a Structural Blue, Flare Yellow or Rioja Red.

They need to go all on out, balls to the wall in luxury and performance. Have that YET factor. Sporty yet luxurious. Luxurious yet capable. Stop making the interior of the ES less exciting than a Corolla Hatchback. Or be an absolute retard and brag that the ES has more rear legroom than the LS. If that doesn't scream retarded to you then I'm worried for the future of Lexus. They need to do better and this isn't enough. They're trying so hard to make a profit but all along the answer is right in their face. Now a certain someone in this forum asked for people (probably me in this case) to stop saying who Lexus should be like, but at this point I think you all know what they should be now.

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