Official Toyota & Lexus Future Powertrain/Product Discussion

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Per TacomaWorld,
one user states a conversation with TRD team racing tundra. He was then told a turbo diesel + hybrid combination for the next generation. I have my doubts but that would explain the "rumored" +30 MPG and towing capacity.
The only way this will work if Toyota states that this fuel accepts B20 or higher (most likely higher than B20 for emissions standards.)
 

internalaudit

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I think that's a given for anything BEV involving Toyota, at least outside of China.
I sure hope so. I'm so desperate to get into a BEV but too bad the UX is going to be the first Lexus BEV. Hoping the IS and NX will eventually too. Audi's Q4 e-tron looks very appealing but I know the reliability / quality in Toyota vehicles.
 

Ian Schmidt

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Maybe Toyota will team up with Panasonic on the BEV battery front. :) Woo hoo!
That seems actually likely after this morning's announcement that Panasonic has stopped putting additional money into their Tesla joint venture. They won't finish the Nevada Gigafactory and they won't even start on one in China.
 

flexus

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@ssun30 @shizhi do you have any about this. Can't find any info in Japanese and European media. I tried searching C-HR 電動車 (of course with simplified characters) and found only Chinese version of the press release.
 
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spwolf

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@ssun30 @shizhi do you have any about this. Can't find any info in Japanese and European media. I tried searching C-HR 電動車 (of course with simplified characters) and found only Chinese version of the press release.
I think he was already telling us about this before... it has panasonic batteries, and obviously Toyota and Panasonic have been working on batteries for a very long time now, they even started a new company that transferred everything except Tesla batteries under it.
 
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Seriously, any DI engine without complementing port injection should be a big red flag. Toyota did their experiment in the late 90s (3S-FSE/1JZ-FSE with 1st gen D-4) and it was a limited-scale disaster. 3S-FSE is very rare in the used market because they have mostly disintegrated. So they got the homework done and introduced self-cleaning D-4S. Mazda and VW also got it right.

The whole L15B series (NA and Turbocharged) is becoming a failed 'Earth Dream'. It only ruined their reputation in China for the time being, but it's a huge ticking time bomb that will detonate sooner if american auto press could stop, forgive my foul language, licking Honda's butt.
Do other automakers use dual injection? I mean, what about Subaru and Mazda? I was thinking most DI engines were strictly DI and didn't have port injection at all... If that is the case, aren't most DI engines a "red flag" by your criteria?
 

Joaquin Ruhi

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Do other automakers use dual injection? I mean, what about Subaru and Mazda? I was thinking most DI engines were strictly DI and didn't have port injection at all... If that is the case, aren't most DI engines a "red flag" by your criteria?
You are correct. Most engines are either direct-injection only or port-injection only. Besides Toyota/Lexus, the only major carmakers to combine both types of injection are Audi and Ford. Arguably the best article I've read on the subject (including a specific list of dual injection engines) is this one by Car and Driver:

https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a15342328/explained-why-some-engines-have-both-port-and-direct-injection/

Keep in mind, though, that it dates back to mid-2017, so other carmakers may have since joined the "dual-injection club". I could be wrong, but I think newer iterations of the Porsche 911 flat-6 might be dual-injected as well.
 

flexus

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I think he was already telling us about this before... it has panasonic batteries, and obviously Toyota and Panasonic have been working on batteries for a very long time now, they even started a new company that transferred everything except Tesla batteries under it.
That's common knowledge. Mystery is battery size, number of motors, range and power.
 
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You are correct. Most engines are either direct-injection only or port-injection only. Besides Toyota/Lexus, the only major carmakers to combine both types of injection are Audi and Ford. Arguably the best article I've read on the subject (including a specific list of dual injection engines) is this one by Car and Driver:

https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a15342328/explained-why-some-engines-have-both-port-and-direct-injection/

Keep in mind, though, that it dates back to mid-2017, so other carmakers may have since joined the "dual-injection club". I could be wrong, but I think newer iterations of the Porsche 911 flat-6 might be dual-injected as well.
Awesome, thanks for clarifying! Great article, too.
 

spwolf

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Do other automakers use dual injection? I mean, what about Subaru and Mazda? I was thinking most DI engines were strictly DI and didn't have port injection at all... If that is the case, aren't most DI engines a "red flag" by your criteria?
engines that use only DI have been vulnerable to carbon deposits, and it is a real issue you will find in their forums.
 

spwolf

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The new-generation Toyota Hybrid System in the 2020 Highlander Hybrid combines a high-efficiency 2.5-liter DOHC four-cylinder engine with two electric motors in a system that's more compact, and more efficient than before. The gas engine employs Variable Valve Timing-intelligent system by Electric motor (VVT-iE) on the intake camshaft, and VVT-i on the exhaust camshaft. A variable cooling system (electric water pump, electric thermostat) and a fully variable oil pump further improve engine efficiency.

The bottom line is an eye opener for the efficiency-minded: 240 total system horsepower and an EPA-estimated 34 combined MPG. The latter is a 17-percent improvement over the previous-generation Highlander Hybrid's 28 combined MPG. Yet, Highlander Hybrid still delivers the everyday acceleration, power and responsiveness that family buyers expect. In another Toyota Highlander first, the hybrid is now available in either 2WD or AWD, further expanding hybrid technology to a new group of buyers.

The transaxle mounts the electric motors (MG1 and MG2) coaxially rather than in-line, and the resulting smaller and lighter package reduces frictional losses. The gas engine and MG2 work in concert to deliver dynamic performance, while both MG1 and MG2 charge the hybrid battery.

To reduce the transaxle's size and weight, the reduction gear is now a parallel shaft gear, rather than a planetary, and a new multi-function gear integrates the power-split planetary ring gear, parking gear, and counter-drive gear. New computer integration and a smaller, lighter power stack installed directly above the transaxle reduce energy transmission losses.
New Highlander Hybrid gets a 240hp version of "300h" powertrain vs 219hp for AWD Rav4 and 215hp for Avalon Hybrid.
Considering that Avalon already has 39hp battery output, I doubt the difference of 25hp is all due to the increased battery output? But it might be.
 
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