Hyundai Motor Group no No. 3 automaker in sales volume | More fires

mikeavelli

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I'm not quite sure I follow you on this one, Mike. If a vehicle is being "coasted", it means that, by definition, it is rolling along without the brakes themselves being used. So, then....why would the brake-lights have to be activated? :unsure:

In a hybrid or EV Lexus you have the choice of activating where the car slows down tremendously when you take the foot off the gas. When you do this it is like braking. If you deactivate it then the car coasts like a normal car when you take your foot off the gas. No braking lights are activated.

I need to look at the RZ tomorrow and get the technical term for it. I do use it and love the feature but it is aggressively slowing the car down thus Lexus makes sure the rear brake lights activate.

In comparison it seems Hyundai/Kia/Genesis don’t activate the rear brakes which can cause confusion and accidents.
 

Sulu

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I'm not quite sure I follow you on this one, Mike. If a vehicle is being "coasted", it means that, by definition, it is rolling along without the brakes themselves being used. So, then....why would the brake-lights have to be activated? :unsure:
When coasting the foot is off the brake and off the accelerator; the car remains running on momentum, but slowing due to engine braking (in a non-electrified car) or regenerative braking (in an EV, hybrid electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid when the driving wheels turn the electric motor acting as generator recharging the battery).

In the newest electrified vehicles, regenerative braking can be quite strong, able to bring the car almost to a full stop without need for normal mechanical brakes (i.e. the foot remaining off the brake pedal). In EVs with the one-pedal driving feature, the driver is able to drive and decelerate to a full stop without having to depress the brake pedal.

If such a vehicle did not automatically apply the brake lights (even though the brake pedal is not depressed), following drivers would not know that the car is slowing and stopping.
 

mmcartalk

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OK, Thanks, Mike and SULU....I was aware of Regenerative-Braking in hybrids and EVs (I've driven and reviewed some)...but that was the first I've heard of brake-lights being on while full-coasting. This is also the first I've heard of Renerative-Braking being able to be deactivated....that must be a relatively new feature in EVs.
 

Levi

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BMW i3 had the same problem when it came out, no brake lights when on pedal driving. They corrected after a few incidents.
 

carguy420

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Don't know if you guys have seen some recent cases of the replacement cost for the Ioniq 5's battery. Over 60k Canadian Dollars once you include labour and tax.

On another note, you've probably seen Hyundai and Kia boast about their really long warranties quite often, but after reading some comments from Hyundai and Kia owners, it seems like Hyundai and Kia are also very willing to find some B.S. excuses to deny customer's warranty claims. Basically making that super long warranty to be completely pointless.
 

mikeavelli

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spwolf

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Don't know if you guys have seen some recent cases of the replacement cost for the Ioniq 5's battery. Over 60k Canadian Dollars once you include labour and tax.

On another note, you've probably seen Hyundai and Kia boast about their really long warranties quite often, but after reading some comments from Hyundai and Kia owners, it seems like Hyundai and Kia are also very willing to find some B.S. excuses to deny customer's warranty claims. Basically making that super long warranty to be completely pointless.

very clear that Hyundai does not care about selling these BEVs in these markets, so they should just go out and say that.
 

mmcartalk

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The truth is that, in general, Hyundais and Kias ARE reliable....a number of credible sources have shown that. Yes, there have been some engine-fire issues (more-so with the electronics in the engine-compartment than with the engine itself). Those have only occurred on a very small number of vehicles, but Hyundai and Kia have been very diligent with recalls, just to be in the safe side....and that may give the impression that the fire hazard is a lot more widespread than it actually is.
 

Levi

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Reliability aside, BEVs have batteries, every every battery in any device should be replaceable. That a car battery costs so much to replace is in itself a crime. It is cheaper to replace a Porsche Flat6. A battery is banal technology, it is not high-tech as some claim.
 

spwolf

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Reliability aside, BEVs have batteries, every every battery in any device should be replaceable. That a car battery costs so much to replace is in itself a crime. It is cheaper to replace a Porsche Flat6. A battery is banal technology, it is not high-tech as some claim.

apparently, most manufacturers are not finding it so banal.
 

Och

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There is nothing banal about these batteries. There is a member on the candlepower (flashlight) forums with permanent lung damage from inhaling smoke from a single exploded lithium flashlight battery. Another member lost several fingers. There are many cases of people getting hurt from exploding batteries in their vape devices.

In NY there has been an epidemic of fires from exploding e-bike batteries, several people have died in these fires, and most buildings have banned e-bikes from being brought inside. Most food delivery people have switched from e-bikes to gas powered motors. There is a new law being considered, either on state or maybe even federal level, that would prohibit import and sales of non certified batteries.

BEV batteries are massive, and their chemical composition is akin to dynamite - everything is premixed for an explosion. Therefore these batteries have systems implemented to make them as safe as possible, and for liability reasons they can not allow anyone to tamper or attempt a repair even on seemingly cosmetic damage to the battery enclosure.

Of course 60k for a battery is insane, but if each battery has to be individually shipped from Korea, the price is justified. They probably have to package it into an explosion proof container, and the shipping insurance must be astronomic after several cargo ships have sunk due to EV fires.
 

carguy420

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The price of the battery might be justified, but this whole dumpster fire certainly isn't worth as much as it costs.

Buy EVs some more lol, your money and maybe even your life will burn down alongside it.
 

Och

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The price of the battery might be justified, but this whole dumpster fire certainly isn't worth as much as it costs.

Buy EVs some more lol, your money and maybe even your life will burn down alongside it.

Quite literally dumpster fires, as some fire departments are resorting to fully submerging burning EVs into dumpsters filled with water. And even then, they often reignite, sometimes several times. Many junk yards wont even take EVs due to fire risks. :ROFLMAO:
 

Ian Schmidt

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Until solid state batteries, the technology just isn't there yet. You see it in the intense depreciation on current BEVs.

As for replacement pricing, I think automakers see that Tesla is really enjoying charging monopoly pricing on parts for their cars and they want in on that action. It's ridiculous that replacing a couple of body panels on a Model 3 is half the retail price of the entire car, but until there's solid EV competition (and Toyota hitting all of their promises with solid state would be a major step in that direction) they'll get away with it.