3.4L TTV6 Engine Failures (V35A-FTS)

Gecko

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I haven't seen this mentioned much here, but the reports of Tundras needing full engine replacements - sometimes multiple - have spread to other models that also use the V35A-FTS twin-turbo V6: Sequoia, LX 600, Land Cruiser 300, and LS 500. The common issue seems to be crank bearing failure.

In the beginning, most folks seemed willing to write off the Tundra's engine failures as "first year issues" but what concerns me is there are 2023 and 2024 Tundras with engine failures. Understandably, Toyota has been talking to and working with owners on these block replacements, but there hasn't been a specific issue or remedy disclosed. Realistically, Toyota will probably never provide details on what failed, but I would have expected them to find the issue and correct it for production over several model years of producing this engine from LS in 2018 to the aforementioned list above in 2024.

Explanations have included:
  • "One bad batch" of engines (seemingly disproven now)
  • Inadequate cleaning of debris from engine blocks during manufacturing
  • Poor fuel quality or the motor requiring higher octane fuel
  • A design flaw with inadequate oiling of the bearing
  • Incorrect oil weight recommended by Toyota
  • Recommended oil change intervals should be 5k instead of 10k
I don't think anyone has a concrete answer on what is happening quite yet.

Considering the number of vehicles Toyota builds with this motor and the low number of failures, I don't think this is a major issue, but what concerns me is the lack of an answer and the fact that the failures keep occuring (sometimes multiple).

This video has some interesting insights:

Does anyone else have more info on this?
 

Flagship1

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No one knows, as you mentioned.

If its a design or production failure hope the failure occurs in warranty.

Some of things you can try (design or production failures will not be fixed by these solutions) are run a high hths oil even bumping up a grade or two, lease, or get a lexus extended warranty.
 

mikeavelli

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The suppliers for Toyota and Lexus are different. Lexus having smaller tolerances for failure I assume. Thus it seems the LX/LC 300 issue has been less than the Tundra. Not to mention the volume difference. There will always statistically be more Tundras with issues. I’ve seen the tundra issues and I feel bad for the owners. But it’s still few and far between.

It seems 3 LX’s had engines that failed. I think around 8k have been sold here so I’ll take those chances.

The video is well done and the presenter knows a ton. Unfortunately it seems like more clickbait hyperbole on trying to say newer boosted engines are bad and older N/A V-8s are better,

Personally the main issues I’ve had in the 600 was been a clicking sound that was fixed and sometimes (like once a month) pretty obvious turbo lag. Outside of that in 32k miles this thing has been a tank.

It just seems to me some of the anti boosted people are really vocal why those engines suck compared to the boosted people who just buy the cars and go about their business. Rarely if ever have I heard a new Tundra or LX etc owner crapping on the much slower and less fuel efficient models.
 

mikeavelli

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And my comments are not about anyone here. The Facebook groups are turning into GX 460 vs GX 550 cesspools It’s tiring.
 

qtb007

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The suppliers for Toyota and Lexus are different. Lexus having smaller tolerances for failure I assume. Thus it seems the LX/LC 300 issue has been less than the Tundra. Not to mention the volume difference. Thete will always statistically be more Tundras with issues. I’ve seen the tundra issues and I feel bad for the owners. But it’s still few and far between.

It seems 3 LX’s had engines that failed. I think around 8k have been sold here so I’ll take those chances.

The video is well done and the presenter knows a ton. Unfortunately it seems like more clickbait hyperbole on trying to say newer boosted engines are bad and older N/A V-8s are better,

Personally the main issues I’ve had in the 600 was been a clicking sound that was fixed and sometimes (like once a month) pretty obvious turbo lag. Outside of that in 32k miles this thing has been a tank.

It just seems to me some of the anti boosted people are really vocal why those engines suck compared to the boosted people who just buy the cars and go about their business. Rarely if ever have I heard a new Tundra or LX etc owner crapping on the much slower and less fuel efficient models.

Content creators / influencers are paid by the click. A video that goes against common convention (Toyota usually good but now bad!) or plays to the schadenfreude of those that don't have the car (like you mention the GX cesspools) will get clicks. Someone posts a failure on the internet and a slick video with a very concerned looking influencer on the thumbnail is that's all that is needed for an anomaly to be taken as gospel.

One of the guys in the r/GRcorolla was asking if he needed to get mechanical failure insurance because of an article about a dealer quote on a warranty claim showing $32k to fix a damaged engine. No customer pays $32k to replace an engine in a $36k car. They'll get a junk yard engine or a refurbished longblock like we've always done. But the articles and youtube videos made about this have poisoned people's minds into thinking that's the true cost they might face if they money shift. Youtube has turned into something that is collectively making us dumber.
 

Gecko

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The suppliers for Toyota and Lexus are different. Lexus having smaller tolerances for failure I assume. Thus it seems the LX/LC 300 issue has been less than the Tundra. Not to mention the volume difference. Thete will always statistically be more Tundras with issues. I’ve seen the tundra issues and I feel bad for the owners. But it’s still few and far between.

The early Tundra wastegate issue did not impact LS 500 and LX 600 at all, and the difference in suppliers seemed to be part of that (thankfully). In this instance with the crank bearings, I would be curious if Toyota uses different suppliers for core/critical engine components like that. Seemingly not since there are multiple models with the same issue.


Anyway, I agree that the YouTube media model isn't helping with things like this and does more harm than good with scare tactics to generate clicks (also why I don't watch the news 😬). With that said, I think Tinkerer's Adventure is more fair than most and has a respected reputation. I thought this video was a fair look at what we know so far without drama or accusations.

I'm not in the market to buy something with the V35A, but I'm more curious if anyone has answers on what seems to be wrong. It's unlike Toyota to have a powertrain issue like this that hasn't been resolved yet, and I expect them to correct it at some point.
 

Flagship1

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The youtuber posted above provides non clickbait material every video he posts and provides a balanced take on issues. He seemed to be the most educated and well prepared for the media gx drive with the chief engineer. He also doesnt seem to scream at the top of his lungs his educational background, toyota connections, begin every single video with the dull catch phrase "Thisss issss", breakouts color coded spreadsheets, door thud test, express severe dislike on the 550 but then say the 460 would be sold if the 550 had this one other feature.

The v35 platform is new and has issues. Time will tell whether these issues are as severe. GC owners usually will be the data hq will pay close attention to due to severity of operational parameters and volume sold.
Does Toyota re-start the powertrain warranty with each new engine replacement?
I dont believe so, but the dealer might offer something as good will.
 

Flagship1

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Content creators / influencers are paid by the click. A video that goes against common convention (Toyota usually good but now bad!) or plays to the schadenfreude of those that don't have the car (like you mention the GX cesspools) will get clicks. Someone posts a failure on the internet and a slick video with a very concerned looking influencer on the thumbnail is that's all that is needed for an anomaly to be taken as gospel.

One of the guys in the r/GRcorolla was asking if he needed to get mechanical failure insurance because of an article about a dealer quote on a warranty claim showing $32k to fix a damaged engine. No customer pays $32k to replace an engine in a $36k car. They'll get a junk yard engine or a refurbished longblock like we've always done. But the articles and youtube videos made about this have poisoned people's minds into thinking that's the true cost they might face if they money shift. Youtube has turned into something that is collectively making us dumber.
Have you sourced a junkyard GR? It will be a while for those to popup
 

ssun30

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The anti-boost crowd conveniently forgot one of the most reliable engine Toyota produces right now is a turbodiesel.

Also the specific output argument used by these people is also invalid. Toyota's truck engines have always had higher specific output than contemporary engines from American manufacturers. The 2UZ-FE 4.7 was more powerful than the Ford 5.4 and similar to Chrysler 4.7. The 1GR-FE was way more powerful than the GM Vortec 4.3 and Ford Cologne 4.0. American manufacturers only caught up in specific output after they decided to put DI in every engine.
The video is well done and the presenter knows a ton. Unfortunately it seems like more clickbait hyperbole on trying to say newer boosted engines are bad and older N/A V-8s are better,
It's not clickbait hyperbole to provide a balanced view from both sides. The theme of the video is "it's not that simple". There's the PR answer from the company staff and real world experience from mechanics.

"The V35A-FTS was designed to be as reliable as possible" and "some of the V35A-FTS built so far have unidentified issues that led to engine failure" can both be true.
 
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mikeavelli

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I am not dissing the man at all. I think it was very well done. It was also done to get those pitchfork NA V-8 people to watch and say how their engine is better. I certainly hope a 15 year old engine not stressed at all is reliable.

3.5 engine sludge issue anyone lol. I mean all engines have had their issues. As @ssun30 stated, the turbo diesel has been fine. The B58 in the supra fine. I don’t recall any glaring reliability issues with the 2.0t unit.

Yes I am biased as we simply haven’t had any engine issues for me to say “pause”. If anything I would love a TTV-8 option.
 

Flagship1

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The anti-boost crowd conveniently forgot one of the most reliable engine Toyota produces right now is a turbodiesel.

Also the specific output argument used by these people is also invalid. Toyota's truck engines have always had higher specific output than contemporary engines from American manufacturers. The 2UZ-FE 4.7 was more powerful than the Ford 5.4 and similar to Chrysler 4.7. The 1GR-FE was way more powerful than the GM Vortec 4.3 and Ford Cologne 4.0. American manufacturers only caught up in specific output after they decided to put DI in every engine.

It's not clickbait hyperbole to provide a balanced view from both sides. The theme of the video is "it's not that simple". There's the PR answer from the company staff and real world experience from mechanics.

"The V35A-FTS was designed to be as reliable as possible" and "some of the V35A-FTS built so far have unidentified issues that led to engine failure" can both be true.
Was the anti boost crowd Toyotas own doing due to the lack of innovation for 15 years on the BOF front. The UR and GR motors were great when the platform launched but a decade had passed before toyota decided to act. Toyota and Lexus were selling reliability at the expense of innovation, marketing that FI was bad design and prone to unreliability.

Meanwhile others worked on and perfected FI like BMW. Heck Toyota threw in the towel on diesels and had to purchase them from BMW for some of their european models or gave folks the dpf curse in aussie with the 2.8.

I am not dissing the man at all. I think it was very well done. It was also done to get those pitchfork NA V-8 people to watch and say how their engine is better. I certainly hope a 15 year old engine not stressed at all is reliable.

3.5 engine sludge issue anyone lol. I mean all engines have had their issues. As @ssun30 stated, the turbo diesel has been fine. The B58 in the supra fine. I don’t recall any glaring reliability issues with the 2.0t unit.
The reason the b58 motor is fine is all due to the fact BMW has been doing modern petrol FI alot longer then Toyota. Toyota is just now getting into the modern petrol FI game and suffering from issues that most of the comeptition have worked out due to their headstart.

For some reason Toyota is the darling child of commoners because at one time they dominated with the legendary 2jz. That company is not the same as todays TMC. If anything the only remenant of that company is GR.

Now the 460 vs 550 is normal, new model after a decade folks gonna be in their feels.
 
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mikeavelli

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I don’t recall Toyota or Lexus saying FI was bad. Maybe owners did on forums. The GS 200t and NX 200t came out nearly ten years ago.

I don’t think the diesel IS was boosted in Europe.

Reliability is job #1 (that doesn’t mean zero issues) so no they won’t move as fast as the Germans. We know that. Even the Germans have learned the limited of boost since the I-4 C63 has been a disaster. Sounds like the CLE 63 will go to anV-8.

All in all honestly all these engines are solid. I would love to see what Range Rover did, use the TT BMW V-8.

As for the 2JZ it was extremely fast as a turbo in the 90s and legendary today. That is a rare overbuilt motor. It’s also ridiculously heavy and without boost, it’s pretty meh. 300 cars were decently fast and reliable but significantly slower than the turbo or a V-8 Lexus back then.
 

ssun30

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Meanwhile others worked on and perfected FI like BMW. Heck Toyota threw in the towel on diesels and had to purchase them from BMW for some of their european models or gave folks the dpf curse in aussie with the 2.8.


The reason the b58 motor is fine is all due to the fact BMW has been doing modern petrol FI alot longer then Toyota. Toyota is just now getting into the modern petrol FI game and suffering from issues that most of the comeptition have worked out due to their headstart.
BMW doesn't have an engine yet that has the same specific output as the G16E-GTS from the factory (S58 is close). In fact very few manufacturers do. So Toyota certainly aren't playing any catch up on the raw power aspect.

What Toyota is really bad at is making these turbocharged engines fuel efficient.
 

sl0519

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BMW doesn't have an engine yet that has the same specific output as the G16E-GTS from the factory (S58 is close). In fact very few manufacturers do. So Toyota certainly aren't playing any catch up on the raw power aspect.

What Toyota is really bad at is making these turbocharged engines fuel efficient.

Put two G16E together and there you have a competitive straight 6 engine. Do it pls!
 

qtb007

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BMW doesn't have an engine yet that has the same specific output as the G16E-GTS from the factory (S58 is close). In fact very few manufacturers do. So Toyota certainly aren't playing any catch up on the raw power aspect.

What Toyota is really bad at is making these turbocharged engines fuel efficient.
FWIW, I'm really happy with the gas mileage in my GR Corolla. 27.9mpg over 8500 miles with plenty of spirited driving in there. My FRS was a little less efficient and way slower.
 
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FWIW, I'm really happy with the gas mileage in my GR Corolla. 27.9mpg over 8500 miles with plenty of spirited driving in there. My FRS was a little less efficient and way slower.

The lesson here is that TMC should let the GR guys develop the powertrains for all Toyota and Lexus vehicles. Easy. Problem solved. They clearly know what they're doing.

Cool factor? Check.
Fuel efficiency? Check.
Power? CHECK.
 

Flagship1

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BMW doesn't have an engine yet that has the same specific output as the G16E-GTS from the factory (S58 is close). In fact very few manufacturers do. So Toyota certainly aren't playing any catch up on the raw power aspect.

What Toyota is really bad at is making these turbocharged engines fuel efficient.
Comparing apples to apples GR and M spec specialty engines you have a point. However I dont think that translates in the regular lexus sphere.

v35 vsb58
t24 vs b48

And i think the only way they seem to be covering the deficiency is by introducing a hybrid variant and up charging.
 

Falcon

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I hope this forces them to extend the 2UR onto other models or put the upcoming TTV8 into more products.
 

Flagship1

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The lesson here is that TMC should let the GR guys develop the powertrains for all Toyota and Lexus vehicles. Easy. Problem solved. They clearly know what they're doing.

Cool factor? Check.
Fuel efficiency? Check.
Power? CHECK.
i hope so too, but i am not going to hold my breath on that one.

Remember this:

I hope this forces them to extend the 2UR onto other models or put the upcoming TTV8 into more products.
I thought the 2UR engine plant was winding down for good and the ttv8 shelved?