Comments
p.s. Just checked Q3, nice base spec for sure. But I cant believe that they dont have auto crash even as option. Thats where UX will do good against it, since advanced level of auto crash, radar cruise and more are available in base spec.

For all the PR their new system (not yet available) get in A8 for being L3 capable (at very specific set of circumstances and speed), most of VW cars have either poor or optional or not even available auto crash.
T
spwolf
I dont think Lexus has to be more affordable or better deal than Volvo in the USA, although none of these cars are good deal when NX is around.

They will likely position it vs X2, as stylish not just standard competitor otherwise nothing really makes sense at the pricing... considering how CT200h was priced 32k, even $33k seems too low.

I would not be surprised if at these pricing, for whatever reason it might be (volume, manufacturing, etc), it might be better for them to sell NX, hence lack of 250 option for NX and hybrid being positioned as only AWD option. Also with that comes loss of available equipment like ML.

So they likely might be trying to not compete with NX.

Since we are talking about relatively low possible volume, something like 20k per year, I dont think that pricing is all that important.
In the U.S., the NX300h is only $2300 or so more over the price of the base NX300 without AWD (36k vs. 38.3k). Not a wonder Lexus isn't even offering the non AWD version of the UX250H. Also, you can't get an F-Sport package on the NX hybrid from what I can see, but you will be able to on the UX250H. I do think that they will certainly price it lower than the NX. I don't think they have a choice here, especially in the U.S., where people tend to equate smaller with less expensive.

Honestly, I felt the CT200h was overpriced for what it was. I test drove it at one point and never once felt it was worth the price tag on the car (neither did the Lexus dealership near me, as they usually had huge discounts on it). It basically was a Scion chassis with a slightly more powerful prius powertrain and Lexus..ish appointments. The car itself was very loud on the inside, the powertrain struggled to move the car up anything resembling an incline, and the inside was rather uninspired. It felt way too much like a Prius with a Lexus badge. Only plus was that it did handle fairly well.

It's pretty easy to push something like the GLA over 40k to get some of the things that a Lexus comes standard with. I have to pay extra to get keyless entry in the year 2018? Seriously? I don't think Lexus will have a difficult time making the UX feel worth the money compared to competitors. The only issue I see is the disparity in powertrains, so they'll need to take that into account when they price it. Many people who haven't driven a Lexus/Toyota hybrid may be turned off by the perceived lack of power, even though I can confirm that the RAV4 hybrid system feels like it's more powerful than it is on paper, especially when you're just driving around in a city.
T
spwolf
I dont think Lexus has to be more affordable or better deal than Volvo in the USA, although none of these cars are good deal when NX is around.

They will likely position it vs X2, as stylish not just standard competitor otherwise nothing really makes sense at the pricing... considering how CT200h was priced 32k, even $33k seems too low.

I would not be surprised if at these pricing, for whatever reason it might be (volume, manufacturing, etc), it might be better for them to sell NX, hence lack of 250 option for NX and hybrid being positioned as only AWD option. Also with that comes loss of available equipment like ML.

So they likely might be trying to not compete with NX.

Since we are talking about relatively low possible volume, something like 20k per year, I dont think that pricing is all that important.
In the U.S., the NX300h is only $2300 or so more over the price of the base NX300 without AWD (36k vs. 38.3k). Not a wonder Lexus isn't even offering the non AWD version of the UX250H. Also, you can't get an F-Sport package on the NX hybrid from what I can see, but you will be able to on the UX250H. I do think that they will certainly price it lower than the NX. I don't think they have a choice here, especially in the U.S., where people tend to equate smaller with less expensive.

Honestly, I felt the CT200h was overpriced for what it was. I test drove it at one point and never once felt it was worth the price tag on the car (neither did the Lexus dealership near me, as they usually had huge discounts on it). It basically was a Scion chassis with a slightly more powerful prius powertrain and Lexus..ish appointments. The car itself was very loud on the inside, the powertrain struggled to move the car up anything resembling an incline, and the inside was rather uninspired. It felt way too much like a Prius with a Lexus badge. Only plus was that it did handle fairly well.

It's pretty easy to push something like the GLA over 40k to get some of the things that a Lexus comes standard with. I have to pay extra to get keyless entry in the year 2018? Seriously? I don't think Lexus will have a difficult time making the UX feel worth the money compared to competitors. The only issue I see is the disparity in powertrains, so they'll need to take that into account when they price it. Many people who haven't driven a Lexus/Toyota hybrid may be turned off by the perceived lack of power, even though I can confirm that the RAV4 hybrid system feels like it's more powerful than it is on paper, especially when you're just driving around in a city.
T
spwolf
I dont think Lexus has to be more affordable or better deal than Volvo in the USA, although none of these cars are good deal when NX is around.

They will likely position it vs X2, as stylish not just standard competitor otherwise nothing really makes sense at the pricing... considering how CT200h was priced 32k, even $33k seems too low.

I would not be surprised if at these pricing, for whatever reason it might be (volume, manufacturing, etc), it might be better for them to sell NX, hence lack of 250 option for NX and hybrid being positioned as only AWD option. Also with that comes loss of available equipment like ML.

So they likely might be trying to not compete with NX.

Since we are talking about relatively low possible volume, something like 20k per year, I dont think that pricing is all that important.
In the U.S., the NX300h is only $2300 or so more over the price of the base NX300 without AWD (36k vs. 38.3k). Not a wonder Lexus isn't even offering the non AWD version of the UX250H. Also, you can't get an F-Sport package on the NX hybrid from what I can see, but you will be able to on the UX250H. I do think that they will certainly price it lower than the NX. I don't think they have a choice here, especially in the U.S., where people tend to equate smaller with less expensive.

Honestly, I felt the CT200h was overpriced for what it was. I test drove it at one point and never once felt it was worth the price tag on the car (neither did the Lexus dealership near me, as they usually had huge discounts on it). It basically was a Scion chassis with a slightly more powerful prius powertrain and Lexus..ish appointments. The car itself was very loud on the inside, the powertrain struggled to move the car up anything resembling an incline, and the inside was rather uninspired. It felt way too much like a Prius with a Lexus badge. Only plus was that it did handle fairly well.

It's pretty easy to push something like the GLA over 40k to get some of the things that a Lexus comes standard with. I have to pay extra to get keyless entry in the year 2018? Seriously? I don't think Lexus will have a difficult time making the UX feel worth the money compared to competitors. The only issue I see is the disparity in powertrains, so they'll need to take that into account when they price it. Many people who haven't driven a Lexus/Toyota hybrid may be turned off by the perceived lack of power, even though I can confirm that the RAV4 hybrid system feels like it's more powerful than it is on paper, especially when you're just driving around in a city.
T
spwolf
I dont think Lexus has to be more affordable or better deal than Volvo in the USA, although none of these cars are good deal when NX is around.

They will likely position it vs X2, as stylish not just standard competitor otherwise nothing really makes sense at the pricing... considering how CT200h was priced 32k, even $33k seems too low.

I would not be surprised if at these pricing, for whatever reason it might be (volume, manufacturing, etc), it might be better for them to sell NX, hence lack of 250 option for NX and hybrid being positioned as only AWD option. Also with that comes loss of available equipment like ML.

So they likely might be trying to not compete with NX.

Since we are talking about relatively low possible volume, something like 20k per year, I dont think that pricing is all that important.
In the U.S., the NX300h is only $2300 or so more over the price of the base NX300 without AWD (36k vs. 38.3k). Not a wonder Lexus isn't even offering the non AWD version of the UX250H. Also, you can't get an F-Sport package on the NX hybrid from what I can see, but you will be able to on the UX250H. I do think that they will certainly price it lower than the NX. I don't think they have a choice here, especially in the U.S., where people tend to equate smaller with less expensive.

Honestly, I felt the CT200h was overpriced for what it was. I test drove it at one point and never once felt it was worth the price tag on the car (neither did the Lexus dealership near me, as they usually had huge discounts on it). It basically was a Scion chassis with a slightly more powerful prius powertrain and Lexus..ish appointments. The car itself was very loud on the inside, the powertrain struggled to move the car up anything resembling an incline, and the inside was rather uninspired. It felt way too much like a Prius with a Lexus badge. Only plus was that it did handle fairly well.

It's pretty easy to push something like the GLA over 40k to get some of the things that a Lexus comes standard with. I have to pay extra to get keyless entry in the year 2018? Seriously? I don't think Lexus will have a difficult time making the UX feel worth the money compared to competitors. The only issue I see is the disparity in powertrains, so they'll need to take that into account when they price it. Many people who haven't driven a Lexus/Toyota hybrid may be turned off by the perceived lack of power, even though I can confirm that the RAV4 hybrid system feels like it's more powerful than it is on paper, especially when you're just driving around in a city.
T
spwolf
I dont think Lexus has to be more affordable or better deal than Volvo in the USA, although none of these cars are good deal when NX is around.

They will likely position it vs X2, as stylish not just standard competitor otherwise nothing really makes sense at the pricing... considering how CT200h was priced 32k, even $33k seems too low.

I would not be surprised if at these pricing, for whatever reason it might be (volume, manufacturing, etc), it might be better for them to sell NX, hence lack of 250 option for NX and hybrid being positioned as only AWD option. Also with that comes loss of available equipment like ML.

So they likely might be trying to not compete with NX.

Since we are talking about relatively low possible volume, something like 20k per year, I dont think that pricing is all that important.
In the U.S., the NX300h is only $2300 or so more over the price of the base NX300 without AWD (36k vs. 38.3k). Not a wonder Lexus isn't even offering the non AWD version of the UX250H. Also, you can't get an F-Sport package on the NX hybrid from what I can see, but you will be able to on the UX250H. I do think that they will certainly price it lower than the NX. I don't think they have a choice here, especially in the U.S., where people tend to equate smaller with less expensive.

Honestly, I felt the CT200h was overpriced for what it was. I test drove it at one point and never once felt it was worth the price tag on the car (neither did the Lexus dealership near me, as they usually had huge discounts on it). It basically was a Scion chassis with a slightly more powerful prius powertrain and Lexus..ish appointments. The car itself was very loud on the inside, the powertrain struggled to move the car up anything resembling an incline, and the inside was rather uninspired. It felt way too much like a Prius with a Lexus badge. Only plus was that it did handle fairly well.

It's pretty easy to push something like the GLA over 40k to get some of the things that a Lexus comes standard with. I have to pay extra to get keyless entry in the year 2018? Seriously? I don't think Lexus will have a difficult time making the UX feel worth the money compared to competitors. The only issue I see is the disparity in powertrains, so they'll need to take that into account when they price it. Many people who haven't driven a Lexus/Toyota hybrid may be turned off by the perceived lack of power, even though I can confirm that the RAV4 hybrid system feels like it's more powerful than it is on paper, especially when you're just driving around in a city.
Some additional bits of information from Douglas Bolduc of Automotive News Europe:

Lexus expects Europe to be the top sales market for the UX...

UX sales in Europe start in October, roughly two months before the U.S. UX deliveries in will begin in Russia and other eastern European markets by year-end while customers in western and central European markets will start getting the car in the first quarter of 2019, a Lexus Europe spokesman said...

Lexus also enhanced the UX's handling by making special adjustments to its exterior. The SUV's so-called Aero Stabilizing Blade Lights in the rear incorporate fins that are designed that helps prevent airflow from wrapping around the back of the vehicle. This helps keep the rear of the car stable when turning and while driving in crosswinds, Lexus said.
http://europe.autonews.com/article/.../lexus-expects-europe-to-be-top-market-for-ux
Some additional bits of information from Douglas Bolduc of Automotive News Europe:

Lexus expects Europe to be the top sales market for the UX...

UX sales in Europe start in October, roughly two months before the U.S. UX deliveries in will begin in Russia and other eastern European markets by year-end while customers in western and central European markets will start getting the car in the first quarter of 2019, a Lexus Europe spokesman said...

Lexus also enhanced the UX's handling by making special adjustments to its exterior. The SUV's so-called Aero Stabilizing Blade Lights in the rear incorporate fins that are designed that helps prevent airflow from wrapping around the back of the vehicle. This helps keep the rear of the car stable when turning and while driving in crosswinds, Lexus said.
http://europe.autonews.com/article/.../lexus-expects-europe-to-be-top-market-for-ux
Some additional bits of information from Douglas Bolduc of Automotive News Europe:

Lexus expects Europe to be the top sales market for the UX...

UX sales in Europe start in October, roughly two months before the U.S. UX deliveries in will begin in Russia and other eastern European markets by year-end while customers in western and central European markets will start getting the car in the first quarter of 2019, a Lexus Europe spokesman said...

Lexus also enhanced the UX's handling by making special adjustments to its exterior. The SUV's so-called Aero Stabilizing Blade Lights in the rear incorporate fins that are designed that helps prevent airflow from wrapping around the back of the vehicle. This helps keep the rear of the car stable when turning and while driving in crosswinds, Lexus said.
http://europe.autonews.com/article/.../lexus-expects-europe-to-be-top-market-for-ux
Some additional bits of information from Douglas Bolduc of Automotive News Europe:

Lexus expects Europe to be the top sales market for the UX...

UX sales in Europe start in October, roughly two months before the U.S. UX deliveries in will begin in Russia and other eastern European markets by year-end while customers in western and central European markets will start getting the car in the first quarter of 2019, a Lexus Europe spokesman said...

Lexus also enhanced the UX's handling by making special adjustments to its exterior. The SUV's so-called Aero Stabilizing Blade Lights in the rear incorporate fins that are designed that helps prevent airflow from wrapping around the back of the vehicle. This helps keep the rear of the car stable when turning and while driving in crosswinds, Lexus said.
http://europe.autonews.com/article/.../lexus-expects-europe-to-be-top-market-for-ux
Some additional bits of information from Douglas Bolduc of Automotive News Europe:

Lexus expects Europe to be the top sales market for the UX...

UX sales in Europe start in October, roughly two months before the U.S. UX deliveries in will begin in Russia and other eastern European markets by year-end while customers in western and central European markets will start getting the car in the first quarter of 2019, a Lexus Europe spokesman said...

Lexus also enhanced the UX's handling by making special adjustments to its exterior. The SUV's so-called Aero Stabilizing Blade Lights in the rear incorporate fins that are designed that helps prevent airflow from wrapping around the back of the vehicle. This helps keep the rear of the car stable when turning and while driving in crosswinds, Lexus said.
http://europe.autonews.com/article/.../lexus-expects-europe-to-be-top-market-for-ux
T
Makes sense. I think the size of it will be a turn off for some in the U.S. market. That's probably what will push many to the NX. With all this mention of aerodynamics, I'm interested to see how the EPA rating turns out for the UX.
T
Makes sense. I think the size of it will be a turn off for some in the U.S. market. That's probably what will push many to the NX. With all this mention of aerodynamics, I'm interested to see how the EPA rating turns out for the UX.
T
Makes sense. I think the size of it will be a turn off for some in the U.S. market. That's probably what will push many to the NX. With all this mention of aerodynamics, I'm interested to see how the EPA rating turns out for the UX.
T
Makes sense. I think the size of it will be a turn off for some in the U.S. market. That's probably what will push many to the NX. With all this mention of aerodynamics, I'm interested to see how the EPA rating turns out for the UX.
T
Makes sense. I think the size of it will be a turn off for some in the U.S. market. That's probably what will push many to the NX. With all this mention of aerodynamics, I'm interested to see how the EPA rating turns out for the UX.
Big PR from Lexus:
http://pressroom.lexus.com/releases...ives+in+new+york+for+north+american+debut.htm

- UX 2.0l gets 33 MPG
- UX250h comes with standard eAWD and gets 38 MPG.


Those are crazy good numbers.
Big PR from Lexus:
http://pressroom.lexus.com/releases...ives+in+new+york+for+north+american+debut.htm

- UX 2.0l gets 33 MPG
- UX250h comes with standard eAWD and gets 38 MPG.


Those are crazy good numbers.
Big PR from Lexus:
http://pressroom.lexus.com/releases...ives+in+new+york+for+north+american+debut.htm

- UX 2.0l gets 33 MPG
- UX250h comes with standard eAWD and gets 38 MPG.


Those are crazy good numbers.
Big PR from Lexus:
http://pressroom.lexus.com/releases...ives+in+new+york+for+north+american+debut.htm

- UX 2.0l gets 33 MPG
- UX250h comes with standard eAWD and gets 38 MPG.


Those are crazy good numbers.
Big PR from Lexus:
http://pressroom.lexus.com/releases...ives+in+new+york+for+north+american+debut.htm

- UX 2.0l gets 33 MPG
- UX250h comes with standard eAWD and gets 38 MPG.


Those are crazy good numbers.
Big PR from Lexus:
http://pressroom.lexus.com/releases...ives+in+new+york+for+north+american+debut.htm

- UX 2.0l gets 33 MPG
- UX250h comes with standard eAWD and gets 38 MPG.


Those are crazy good numbers.
Standard AWD and almost 40MPG - wow!
Standard AWD and almost 40MPG - wow!

G
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