Video: Creating the Aluminum Wood Trim in the New Lexus RX

Discussion in 'Lexus Lounge' started by krew, Oct 29, 2015.

  1. krew
    krew Administrator
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    krew [​IMG]

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  2. Black Dynamite
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    Honestly, I really don't like this wood design. Burl Walnut is just fine with me. This is a swing and a miss with me.
    BD
     
  3. JFB
    JFB
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    Well, as long as Lexus completely stops using plastic "metal-effect" trim, I'll be happy. Did they not notice that the Germans have been using actual metal-coated trim for years now? Silver plastic is just not nice to touch and convinces no-one.
     
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  4. CIF
    CIF Premium Member
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    I'd be fine with that, as long as any metal trim is not used in any touch areas of the interior, or spots where glare can be a factor. Several real-world practical issues come into play here; many real metals are highly reflective, and due to their reflectiveness can exhibit strong glare and reflections while driving, which is annoying as well as dangerous. Also real metal on warm days gets really hot in an interior, and very cold in winter days, especially for those that live in cold climates. I've experienced all of these problems first-hand myself in some German competitors, as well as other Japanese vehicles. There's nothing luxurious about grabbing a metal interior door handle that's scorching hot during a hot day, or placing your hand on a door armrest, only to be startled by a scorching hot or ice cold piece of real metal touching your arm. Also living in a climate with strong sunlight, even with excellent sunglasses, I had a difficult time driving a competitor vehicle due to extreme glare and reflections occurring from the real metal trim in the vehicle, that was positioned very poorly in the interior in terms of sunlight angles.
     
  5. Dreski
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    Looks really good.
     
  6. Mohammed Taha
    Mohammed Taha Founding Member
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    I'm sure most interior designers would take those into consideration; form follows function. As for metal going hot or cold, have you forgotten that all cars use metallic seat belt buckle clips? I've been stung many times. Metal is usually not used because of a) contractions and expansions b) weight c) simplicity of molding plastic vs metal. However, using anodized aluminum, which is lighter, is better than painted plastic from a luxury perspective. Also, the contractions and expansions can be calculated and adjustments made to avoid disastrous effects.

    If I wanted fake metal plastic I would buy a cheaper car. However, I'm buying a Lexus therefore if something is meant to exhibit the characteristics of metal, it better be metal not painted plastic. Would you accept it if you went to a Michelin star restaurant, ordered crab and was served some simulated artificial garbage?
     
  7. CIF
    CIF Premium Member
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    Not to repeat myself, but again, I drove several German competitors (and a few lower-tier Japanese competitors to Lexus) and to varying degrees, many of the models exhibited the problems listed above. So clearly, those designers in those cars did not fully take into consideration all of the above aspects. Otherwise I would not have had the hassle I did driving those models. Sure, all cars use metal seat belt buckle clips, but not all luxury cars have the entire seat belt piece completely metal. It's usually a plastic surround which encircles the metal buckle. A few brands I believe may have all-metal surrounds.

    I won't pretend to know on what basis metal is or isn't used in luxury cars, aside from obvious parameters like cost, weight, contraction/expansion. I have heard anecdotally that in the past, Lexus has been very conservative about using large amounts of real metal in an interior, due to the problems above that I myself have observed.

    You misunderstand what I said. I am not against the idea of real metal itself. Obviously in a real luxury car I prefer real vs. fake materials. With that said, I would prefer real metal only if that brand has taken the extreme and utmost care to alleviate the above-observed issues. This is simply my personal view on it. Some may not agree of course. If the above-noted problems cannot be alleviated, then I would rather real metal not be used, rather an alternative material be used, preferably an alternative that is a real material itself.

    Finally, in my own humble opinion, I generally do not like metal trim in an interior, regardless of whether it's real or fake metal. I personally much prefer wood trim over metal trim, or simply any sort of soft-touch trim.