Should TMC Involve More in Breaking Records?

Airplane

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I know TMC is involved in GT3, WRC, WEC, NASCAR and Super GT racings and have been winning (dominating) a lot lately, but I find it somewhat wasted because none of it get fully transfered to their road cars (performance wise).
They will introduce a lot of performance cars in the near future but I have yet to see TMC really try to shake the industry since the LFA (again, performance).
What bothers me is I know they have the ability but they seem to be not interested in breaking road car records? The TNGA is such a good chassis system that even something like the CHR could handle 600HP with ease and it seems wasted for just 144HP.
I know Japanese companies are often very humble and really take their time for long term benefits but I really want them to shutter lap records because it would be fun to break people's mind once in a while and in this case, almost 10 years since the LFA. I mean they could have the LFA run the Nurburgring again with race tyres and possibly break the record since the track has way better condition than in 2012.

They partially own Subaru and Mazda and after the Supra I have a feeling TMC might even get involed with BMW more in the future as well. Why not use what they have and just do it?

What do y'all think?
 
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Airplane

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They have nothing more to prove after the LFA did 7:14 with road tyres.
Well time have changed and they will be left out if they don't move on. They wouldn't have made the LC, the RC and the Fs if they just stayed comfortable at where they were at. If TMC invest a lot in motorsports then why not spread out the cost in their road cars?
 
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ssun30

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Well time have changed and they will be left out if they don't move on. They wouldn't have made the LC, the RC and the Fs if they just stayed comfortable at where they were at. If TMC invest a lot in motorsports then why not profit from the investments in their road cars?
I'm pretty sure their GR Super Sport hyper car will break tons of records since it's basically a road homologation of a Le Mans race car.
 

Airplane

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I'm pretty sure their GR Super Sport hyper car will break tons of records since it's basically a road homologation of a Le Mans race car.
Yep, I know TMC can but they just don't, if you know what I'm saying. The TS050 was faster than the 919 last season and if they make a TS050 "EVO" aka GR Super Sport they will break many records. It's heartbreaking when I saw the Aventador SVJ just broke the Nuburgring record, especially when it's been essentially VW(Lambo) vs VW (Porsche) this whole time since 2 years ago.:joy:
 

ssun30

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Yep, I know TMC can but they just don't, if you know what I'm saying. The TS050 was faster than the 919 last season and if they make a TS050 "EVO" aka GR Super Sport they will break many records. It's heartbreaking when I saw the Aventador SVJ just broke the Nuburgring record, especially when it's been essentially VW(Lambo) vs VW (Porsche) this whole time since 2 years ago.:joy:
Breaking records on the Green Hell is not hard; it's easy. Use the grippiest tyres, add more aero, throw away weight, tune the suspension and gear the transmission specifically for the corners, then hire the most experienced driver and run the circuit again and again. During the process you get a car that is barely drivable, safe, and tolerable on normal roads. It's all about the sacrifice you are willing to make: break a record or break the owner's bone?
 

F1 Silver Arrows

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Yep, I know TMC can but they just don't, if you know what I'm saying. The TS050 was faster than the 919 last season and if they make a TS050 "EVO" aka GR Super Sport they will break many records. It's heartbreaking when I saw the Aventador SVJ just broke the Nuburgring record, especially when it's been essentially VW(Lambo) vs VW (Porsche) this whole time since 2 years ago.:joy:
Ah! I was going to make a post in the Garage in regards to the Lamborghini Aventador SVJ breaking the lap record by a good two seconds. Quite a legendary fight between Lamborghini and Porsche. At the end, VW is the overall winner. I am a huge fan of what the VW group are up to nowadays (except for dieselgate), and they are front runners in the development race in terms of bringing out the best technologies, while some may not be bulletproof, still they are doing much more for the progression for our world than most companies out there. Congratulations Lamborghini, Porsche, VW and others.

Breaking records on the Green Hell is not hard; it's easy. Use the grippiest tyres, add more aero, throw away weight, tune the suspension and gear the transmission specifically for the corners, then hire the most experienced driver and run the circuit again and again. During the process you get a car that is barely drivable, safe, and tolerable on normal roads. It's all about the sacrifice you are willing to make: break a record or break the owner's bone?
It is definitely not easy, such statements should be disregarded immediately. Like you just said yourself in the last two sentences (or actually the rest of your post), you've contradicted yourself, and on top of that, just that is enough to deem this an immense challenge by itself. To attempt to shatter a lap record deep within the six minute mark, while still being a road legal road car, and being safe within the regulations at the same time? You would need balls that are more dense than a black hole. If you have taken notice, the driver (Marco Mapelli) had made tiny mistakes throughout the lap, because of him pushing so damn hard. Any harder and that car would have taken flight. Imagine all of those tiny mistakes not being there; 6:40:00 perhaps? You may not know but the Aventador is probably one of the most stable cars of all time. Taut chassis, responsive, forgiving handling, and by itself it is already a monster of a car. Literally eats 99% of the cars on the road. So capable, fun, and amazing. You've just totally disregarded this fact. It is not just adding more upgrades, it is whether the car would be able to sustain such high pressure while doing all the things a road legal car should, and manifest everything on track, especially on such a high pressure environment like the Nürburgring Nordschleife. If it was illegal on the streets, then yeah, it probably would have focused on other factors while also being able to disregard a lot of the regulations you would need so it would be legal for the road.

No hard feelings man, don't take this as an attack, but so many amazing people have given their lives trying to race there, and we almost lost another legend that is very dear around the motor racing world and Formula One, Niki Lauda in 1976 when he crashed and his Ferrari going ablaze.
 
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ssun30

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Ah! I was going to make a post in the Garage in regards to the Lamborghini Aventador SVJ breaking the lap record by a good two seconds. Quite a legendary fight between Lamborghini and Porsche. At the end, VW is the overall winner. I am a huge fan of what the VW group are up to nowadays (except for dieselgate), and they are front runners in the development race in terms of bringing out the best technologies, while some may not be bulletproof, still they are doing much more for the progression for our world than most companies out there. Congratulations Lamborghini, Porsche, VW and others.



It is definitely not easy, such statements should be disregarded immediately. Like you just said yourself in the last two sentences (or actually the rest of your post), you've contradicted yourself, and on top of that, just that is enough to deem this an immense challenge by itself. To attempt to shatter a lap record deep within the six minute mark, while still being a road legal road car, and being safe within the regulations at the same time? You would need balls that are more dense than a black hole. If you have taken notice, the driver (Marco Mapelli) had made tiny mistakes throughout the lap, because of him pushing so damn hard. Any harder and that car would have taken flight. Imagine all of those tiny mistakes not being there; 6:40:00 perhaps? You may not know but the Aventador is probably one of the most stable cars of all time. Taut chassis, responsive, forgiving handling, and by itself it is already a monster of a car. Literally eats 99% of the cars on the road. So capable, fun, and amazing. You've just totally disregarded this fact. It is not just adding more upgrades, it is whether the car would be able to sustain such high pressure while doing all the things a road legal car should, and manifest everything on track, especially on such a high pressure environment like the Nürburgring Nordschleife. If it was illegal on the streets, then yeah, it probably would have focused on other factors while also being able to disregard a lot of the regulations you would need so it would be legal for the road.

No hard feelings man, don't take this as an attack, but so many amazing people have given their lives trying to race there, and we almost lost another legend that is very dear around the motor racing world and Formula One, Niki Lauda in 1976 when he crashed when his Ferrari went ablaze.
I wasn't referring to the engineering, tuning, and driving when I said it was easy. After all, it took a lot of effort for Lexus to do 7:14 on road tyres. What Lambo did was absolutely impressive from an engineering perspective.

What I meant by easy was that it is easy to make the decision on 'how drivable the car should be on regular roads'. In particular it is an easy decision for Volkswagen since it has two supercar brands that benefit immensely from track records. But it WAS a hard decision for Lexus when it chose to run the LFA Nur on road tyres. Different priorities, different decisions.

But in the end, it doesn't matter how close the car is to a road-illegal track car. If it's road-legal it's road-legal. A Radical SR8 was road-legal and held the record for a long time, although people back then put an asterisk on its record. VW took the definition literally and made the easy decision. But what they did was not easy.

Regardless, thanks for the clarification.
 

Ian Schmidt

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During the process you get a car that is barely drivable, safe, and tolerable on normal roads. It's all about the sacrifice you are willing to make: break a record or break the owner's bone?
One of the auto sites had an editorial a few years ago pleading with carmakers to stop testing on the Ring because, as you say, it's resulting in cars that are harder to drive, less comfortable, and handle worse on normal roads. It's become too easy of a benchmark for manufacturers, and it does nothing for the reasons most people buy cars (aside from Porsche/Lambo/Bugatti).
 
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