Lexus ES: Third Generation

Texas Jury Awards $242 Million to Family for Lexus Seat Defects

Lexus ES 300 Accident

A civil jury in Texas has fined Toyota $242 million after an accident in a 2003 Lexus ES 300 saw two children severely injured due to collapsing front seats — from CBS News:

Ben and Kristi Reavis were stopped in traffic on a Dallas area expressway on the way home from church in September 2016. Their two kids, 3-year-old Owen and 5-year-old Emily, were in the back, in their car seats, when an SUV slammed into the back of their 2002 Lexus sedan at 45 mph. As a crash test simulating the crash and used during the trial shows, the front seats collapsed, sending Ben and Kristi head first into their own children. Both kids suffered lasting traumatic brain injuries.

In a statement, Toyota said it respects the jury’s more than $242 million verdict but remains “confident that the injuries sustained were the result of factors specific to this very severe collision, not a defect in the design or manufacturing.”

Comments
I guess I'm lost, where is the actual rear-ender in all this? Shouldn't they be at fault and their insurance cover whatever injuries were sustained in the accident?
Trump using all his weapons!
zeusus
I guess I'm lost, where is the actual rear-ender in all this? Shouldn't they be at fault and their insurance cover whatever injuries were sustained in the accident?
The rear ender isn't responsible for manufacturer errors. Per the CBS article, Toyota admitted in open court that they've known about this seat problem for decades. Hence the gross negligence verdict.
@Ruksac

If so why they didn't ask Toyota to do a recall, if they didn't forced TMC to do the recall, then there's no fatal reason to be recalled on behalf

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The ES on streets from how many years,, this model exactly and never got any fatal accident and passed the safety

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The rear even Lexus is fault the rear hitter must be and should be responsible for the major part

So
Unless Lexus management hit the ES from behind

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Unless the safety side airbags not operated

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Unless this is the only car have this problem and in purpose as VAG emission they are whom made the emission thing insisting in cheating

This is acceptable, otherwise I am seeing it as political pressure on one of the Japanese car from one of Pro Trump judges
C
  • C
  • August 24, 2018
It's not just the ES. It's the way seats are traditionally designed in passenger cars. There's been no specific standard mandated as to collapsing seats. The theory behind the suit is Lexus (as well as other manufacturers) are aware of inherent risks with traditional seat designs but continue to build their vehicles with them anyway. I suspect this will be a new standard if it isn't already for new cars going forward. Audi got sued for the exact same thing. Seat frames and corresponding mechanisms need to be more rigid in the event of a rear impact as to not crush occupants in the back seat.
CT2IS
It's not just the ES. It's the way seats are traditionally designed in passenger cars. There's been no specific standard mandated as to collapsing seats. The theory behind the suit is Lexus (as well as other manufacturers) are aware of inherent risks with traditional seat designs but continue to build their vehicles with them anyway. I suspect this will be a new standard if it isn't already for new cars going forward. Audi got sued for the exact same thing. Seat frames and corresponding mechanisms need to be more rigid in the event of a rear impact as to not crush occupants in the back seat.
Welcome @CT2IS to Lexus Enthusiast! :)
k...

so it was a 13 year old ES at the time. alot can happen in 13 years to a car. seats can be replaced, seats can be taken out for cleaning.
if i drive to texas, will someone please slam into the back of my 18 year old LS going 45 mph? i could use $242,000,000.00.
CT2IS
It's not just the ES. It's the way seats are traditionally designed in passenger cars. There's been no specific standard mandated as to collapsing seats. The theory behind the suit is Lexus (as well as other manufacturers) are aware of inherent risks with traditional seat designs but continue to build their vehicles with them anyway. I suspect this will be a new standard if it isn't already for new cars going forward. Audi got sued for the exact same thing. Seat frames and corresponding mechanisms need to be more rigid in the event of a rear impact as to not crush occupants in the back seat.
as much as i briefly read, their lawyer said that anti-whiplash design for front seats is what created the issue. You cant have too rigid front seats, because then that means that front seat passengers are easily hurt.

S
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