Hyundai engine horror show

IS-SV

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Exactly. And what a lot of people forget is that is what Toyota and Lexus service bays used to look like back when the 3.0L V6s were sludging/gelling up from oil that was deteriorating from running too hot.
Was that Toyota 3.0 V6 issue a recall or a class action settlement?
But yes my 2007 Lexus IS350 had several recalls, more than any car I’ve owned.
 

mmcartalk

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Was that Toyota 3.0 V6 issue a recall or a class action settlement?
But yes my 2007 Lexus IS350 had several recalls, more than any car I’ve owned.
The recall on the 3.0L was for head gaskets. The sludge/gel issue was a class action suit.
 

LexsCTJill

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Here is some more pics. Pretty scary stuff if you ask me. I would think twice about signing on the dotted line for a new Hyundai if I saw this crap while at the dealer.
4058
 

LexsCTJill

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Is the bar from side to side holding the engine or is that just to keep the body from twisting due to half the front end being gone?
My immediate guess that it is there for safety? so that as you work on the engine, it does not fall? But yes, maybe it has something to do so that the body does not warp out.
 

LexsCTJill

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If you zoom in, there's a hard-to-see eye-loop it's going through that appears to be holding up the engine.

In fairness to Hyundai, I saw a YouTube video recently about replacing the trunk-mounted battery in a recent Caddy. GM's recommended procedure was to remove the trunk lid, one of the taillights, the trim on the side of the trunk, the underside of the rear window deck, and a few other things. Talk about not designing for service.
Interesting POV. If this was a full engine replacement, I assume the engine would just be fully intact as you remove it. All the parts from the front end were in the back of the vehicle, really strange.
 

mmcartalk

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Honestly... having worked in different Toyota and Lexus dealerships, that sight is not uncommon. And it may not even be the car's fault - people do a lot of stupid things with cars.

Exactly. 👍
 

IS-SV

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The recall on the 3.0L was for head gaskets. The sludge/gel issue was a class action suit.
Got it, recall was for different vehicles (trucks) and different engines than those in oil sludging class action suit.

I am surprised Hyundai stores this junk where customers can see it, not advisable.
 
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Exactly. And what a lot of people forget is that is what Toyota and Lexus service bays used to look like back when the 3.0L V6s were sludging/gelling up from oil that was deteriorating from running too hot.
They were nowhere near as bad as this. Yes, it was a flaw that warranted a settlement but even then they were salvageable. This is a disaster.
 

mmcartalk

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They were nowhere near as bad as this. Yes, it was a flaw that warranted a settlement but even then they were salvageable. This is a disaster.
I drove Toyota and Lexus products from the mid 90s to the mid-2000s. I clearly remember seeing damaged or ruined 3.0L V6 blocks sitting around the service bays. Whether it was worse than this Hyundai issue or not is probably subjective....and varied from dealership to dealership.
 

Ian Schmidt

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The main problem for Hyundai is that a lot of consumers are around who had personal experience with their 90s and early 2000s cars that actually were poor quality, so they can't be seen as backsliding. In Toyota terms it'd be like if the V6 sludge issue had happened in 1986 instead of 2006. (And some have longer memories; my Dad *still* thinks I'm nuts to drive a Japanese car because of the '72 Corona he bought new that blew two engines and a transmission in the first year).
 

mmcartalk

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The main problem for Hyundai is that a lot of consumers are around who had personal experience with their 90s and early 2000s cars that actually were poor quality, so they can't be seen as backsliding.
Much more so with the 90's-vintage Hyundais than the early 2000s. With the exception of the 1997 Tiburon, which showed a noticeable uptick in quality and fit/finish from previous Hyundais, we saw most of the improvement between 2000 and 2006. That was generally the period that turned the corporation from making junk into making credible vehicles.



In Toyota terms it'd be like if the V6 sludge issue had happened in 1986 instead of 2006. (And some have longer memories; my Dad *still* thinks I'm nuts to drive a Japanese car because of the '72 Corona he bought new that blew two engines and a transmission in the first year).
Is your Dad a WWII veteran? The war definitely affected the attitude that many of them had for German and Japanese cars, although that was a long time ago, and I noticed your Dad did have a '72 Corolla. And it was unusual for Toyotas to have major issues or breakdowns in the 1970s....just like Hyundai got over their period of building poor-quality vehicles in the early 2000s, Toyota got over theirs in the 1960s.
 

Ian Schmidt

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Is your Dad a WWII veteran? The war definitely affected the attitude that many of them had for German and Japanese cars, although that was a long time ago, and I noticed your Dad did have a '72 Corolla. And it was unusual for Toyotas to have major issues or breakdowns in the 1970s....just like Hyundai got over their period of building poor-quality vehicles in the early 2000s, Toyota got over theirs in the 1960s.
Vietnam-era vet (but not actually there). They offered to give him an Alfa Spider if he'd re-up in '68 (and potentially be sent to Vietnam) but he declined. Also it was a Corona, not a Corolla. Toyota's probably glad they don't use that name now.
 

suxeL

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If you zoom in, there's a hard-to-see eye-loop it's going through that appears to be holding up the engine.

In fairness to Hyundai, I saw a YouTube video recently about replacing the trunk-mounted battery in a recent Caddy. GM's recommended procedure was to remove the trunk lid, one of the taillights, the trim on the side of the trunk, the underside of the rear window deck, and a few other things. Talk about not designing for service.
Yup zoomed i see the fish hook, causing the entire blue beam to bow. While mistakes happen in production, some more then others, I`m glad theyre stepping upto the plate at least and doing owners right
 

mmcartalk

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Vietnam-era vet (but not actually there). They offered to give him an Alfa Spider if he'd re-up in '68 (and potentially be sent to Vietnam) but he declined. Also it was a Corona, not a Corolla. Toyota's probably glad they don't use that name now.

The Corona name was dropped in 83/84 when the Camry debuted.

Well, there's one I haven't heard before........trying to bribe military people into re-enlisting with new vehicles.🍎
 
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I drove Toyota and Lexus products from the mid 90s to the mid-2000s. I clearly remember seeing damaged or ruined 3.0L V6 blocks sitting around the service bays. Whether it was worse than this Hyundai issue or not is probably subjective....and varied from dealership to dealership.
I'm not taking anything away from your experience. But the point is it definitely wasn't as bad as you see here, and if one were to see Toyota dealerships littered with engines that looked that the ones you see in this Hyundai dealerships, then you'd be talking about an uproar within customers and the entire automotive industry. Heck, even they would feel bad themselves.

I'm surprised this isn't that publicized around the internet, because if this happened at a Toyota or a Lexus dealership then it would be a big deal.
 

spwolf

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Toyota had this with ZZ and AD engineers in Europe. But that was 10 years ago, warranties were prolonged to 8 years for those engines.

TMC us very different company anyway.
 

suxeL

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Toyota had this with ZZ and AD engineers in Europe. But that was 10 years ago, warranties were prolonged to 8 years for those engines.

TMC us very different company anyway.
Do you mean the oil burning issues on the ZZ (I assume this as the 1zzfe placed into the E110 corolla was quite bad in the beginning), and unfamiliar with the AD?
 

Joaquin Ruhi

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Do you mean the oil burning issues on the ZZ (I assume this as the 1zzfe placed into the E110 corolla was quite bad in the beginning), and unfamiliar with the AD?
AD are the 2-liter and 2.2-liter, 4-cylinder turbodiesel engines primarily for the European market. It was used in the Lexus IS 200d and IS 220d variants of 2IS, plus a number of Toyotas (Corolla, Avensis & RAV4)
 
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Do you mean the oil burning issues on the ZZ (I assume this as the 1zzfe placed into the E110 corolla was quite bad in the beginning), and unfamiliar with the AD?
Oil burning issues also affected the 2AZ family engine too. I know this because I have one. Now that the car is high mileage, this is when the issues come about.
 

suxeL

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AD are the 2-liter and 2.2-liter, 4-cylinder turbodiesel engines primarily for the European market. It was used in the Lexus IS 200d and IS 220d variants of 2IS, plus a number of Toyotas (Corolla, Avensis & RAV4)
Interesting. Are these associated with the engine themselves or the post combustion issues that still are a nuisance from time to time. (Australian prados before the refresh had a class action ongoing for their particulate filter run setting i believe).


Oil burning issues also affected the 2AZ family engine too. I know this because I have one. Now that the car is high mileage, this is when the issues come about.
I remember reading the documentary version on the lead on the E110 project which had the introduction of the 1zz motor. Seemed like the financial market situation forced Toyotas hand on the vehicle budget.

For instance the E110 1998-2000 interior was actually not the original launch interior. Instead they pushed back their actual interior to their refresh and reworked the previous gen into the launch models. The E110 had the infamous oil return hole issues. The VVTi system on that mid cycle refresh again was supposedly pushed back to the refresh. I`ll see if i can repost the article here.
 
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