Honda, Mazda, Nissan, Subaru, Toyota form JAMBE to promote model-based development with suppliers

Sulu

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Five Japanese car manufacturers (Honda, Mazda, Nissan, Subaru, Toyota) and five parts suppliers (Aisin, Jatco, Denso, Panasonic and Mitsubishi Electric) have agreed to standardise the way vehicles are designed in order to accelerate development and reduce costs.

All ten companies have announced that they will be the founding members of the new Japan Automotive Model-Based Engineering (JAMBE), which aims to promote the use of model-based development (MBD).

With MBD, every part is created in digital form to make up a virtual car that can then be subjected to a variety of simulations so engineers can identify potential issues and rectify them before continuing product development. Compared to building and testing actual prototypes, this approach is not only faster, but also more cost-efficient.

Some major automakers are already using MBD for their cars, but JAMBE brings in parts suppliers into the mix, allowing the same models to be used across companies in the engineering chain for better efficiency. This also reduces the need for companies to rework parts or modify designs to meet the requirements of each automaker, which helps reduce time and money spent.

“We don’t have the luxury of spending time to iron out differences between vehicle and parts makers,” said Mitsuo Hitomi, senior innovation fellow at Mazda, as reported by Nikkei Asia. “We will improve efficiency where we can so that we can focus on investing in such areas as environmental technologies,” he added.

Mazda used MBD when coming up with its SkyActiv technology that went into the first-generation CX-5 that was released in 2012. Other automakers like Honda and Toyota have also adopted MBD and this method is now the mainstream in the industry, although parts suppliers are still catching up. This is because of limited budgets, with lower-tier suppliers still dependent on the skills of machinists and not embracing digital design and development.

The founding of JAMBE aims to create an industry where digital models can be shared across the board, linking academic research with development of parts, systems and vehicles. This allows parties to coordinate and make adjustments digitally from the initial stages of development.

Designing and building the complete car digitally, including components provided by third-party suppliers, should save development costs by saving on the various types of prototypes (i.e. real, physical models rather than virtual, digital models) that are built during the course of development of a model.

But by making third-party components truly common, even across different auto brands, will mean that if a vehicle is recalled for a component failure, many, many more vehicles will be affected (think Takata airbag recall on a larger scale).
 

mmcartalk

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Some of this probably isn't that new. Toyota and Subaru, for instance, jointly did the B-RZ and FT86. Toyota/Scion and Mazda, I believe, also sold some versions of each other's rebadged small cars.
 

Levi

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looks like next Lexus IS/Mazda 6 could fit in there. if the these twins are like the 86/BRZ, there is nothing to worry about (i expect more design and powertrain differentiation). it is interesting to see Nissan in there. i think Nissan will try to be Japanese again.
 

Sulu

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it is interesting to see Nissan in there. i think Nissan will try to be Japanese again.
I notice that some Japanese automakers (small ones) are missing:
  • Daihatsu (I wonder if it is included with Toyota?)
  • Mitsubishi (I wonder if it is included with Nissan?)
  • Suzuki
  • Isuzu
I am somewhat surprised that Honda is in this group. Lately, Honda has seemed to be avoiding anything that has "Toyota" on it, such as partnering with GM on EVs rather than Toyota, Subaru and others.
 

Levi

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I notice that some Japanese automakers (small ones) are missing:
  • Daihatsu (I wonder if it is included with Toyota?)
  • Mitsubishi (I wonder if it is included with Nissan?)
  • Suzuki
  • Isuzu
I am somewhat surprised that Honda is in this group. Lately, Honda has seemed to be avoiding anything that has "Toyota" on it, such as partnering with GM on EVs rather than Toyota, Subaru and others.
Isuzu does not really make cars, with exception of on truck/suv, so no much point for them. Daihatsu is definitely part of Toyota, as is Lexus. Mitsubishi (Motors) is very likely to be part of Nissan, as they own 34% of stock, more than Mitsubishi Corporation. Suzuki makes many other products, cars a small part of what they do, they already have two rebadged Toyota's, so while they are not with Toyota, they would indirectly profit from this.
 

maiaramdan

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I notice that some Japanese automakers (small ones) are missing:
  • Daihatsu (I wonder if it is included with Toyota?)
  • Mitsubishi (I wonder if it is included with Nissan?)
  • Suzuki
  • Isuzu
I am somewhat surprised that Honda is in this group. Lately, Honda has seemed to be avoiding anything that has "Toyota" on it, such as partnering with GM on EVs rather than Toyota, Subaru and others.
While you are surprised from those missing carmaker, I am surprised for putting Mazda & Subaru when we all knows that they won't have a totally designed model and all will get it's R&D with Toyota same with suppliers the first 4 either partly or totally related to Toyota Corp