Joaquin Ruhi

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...perhaps rumors of the 2.4L T may actually be potent enough to honor the "500" badge. But the power numbers from that 4cyl , IMO, need to be in the upper 380+ hp / lb-ft torque which I'm skeptical.
The rumored 2.4-liter turbo will probably be badged "350", if recently-filed NX trademarks are anything to go by. Thus, the confusing situation where you have an LC 500 powered by a 5-liter V8 and an LS 500 powered by a 3.5-liter twin-turbo V6 will spread throughout the Lexus model range, which will next year likely see IS, ES, RC and RX 350s powered by the carryover 2GR 3.5-liter V6 and NX 350 as a 2.4-liter turbo 4.
 

internalaudit

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Eight years is 2028, by then most of the competition would have gone electric lol (by 2025, 20 from Audi, 20 from VW, 6 from Toyota, 3 from Lexus, at least 4 from Volvo/Polestar, at least 3 from BMW, Macan / 918 from Porsche).

I doubt anyone would be buying a 3.3IS with an updated interior in 2028. Let's be realistic, people are not ignorant, especially those who at least read C/D on a regular basis.
 
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Eight years is 2028, by then most of the competition would have gone electric lol (by 2025, 20 from Audi, 20 from VW, 6 from Toyota, 3 from Lexus, at least 4 from Volvo/Polestar, at least 3 from BMW, Macan / 918 from Porsche).
Sorry, but forecasts show that electric vehicles will still represent a small percentage of the total of global/U.S. car sales.

"The number of EVs on U.S. roads is projected to reach 18.7 million in 2030, up from 1 million at the end of 2018. This is about 7 percent of the 259 million vehicles (cars and light trucks) expected to be on U.S. roads in 2030. "

https://www.eei.org/resourcesandmedia/energytalk/Pages/Issue-In-Depth-11-1-2018.html#:~:text=Additional highlights from the EEI,on U.S. roads in 2030.

I doubt anyone would be buying a 3.3IS with an updated interior in 2028. Let's be realistic, people are not ignorant, especially those who at least read C/D on a regular basis.
Your statement holds very little merit, especially considering that the dated 3rd generation IS has been around for 7+ years and yet it's still competitive sales wise in the luxury small car segment.

Also take a look at Infinti's archaic Q50, which has also been around for 7+ years, but has the 3rd highest sales numbers (YTD 2020) in the luxury small car segment.

Acura ILX - 2,741
Acura TLX - 5,484
Alfa Romeo Giulia - 1759
Audi A3 - 2,238
Audi A4 - 3,950
Audi A5 - 5,320
BMW 2-Series - 1,772
BMW 3-Series - 10,613
BMW 4-Series - 2,198
BMW i3 - 64
Cadillac ATS - 47
Cadillac CT4 - 40
Cadillac CT5 - 3,000
Genesis G70 - 2,074
Infiniti Q50 - 5,575
Infiniti Q60 - 927
Jaguar XE - 0
Lexus CT - 0
Lexus IS - 2,712
Lexus RC - 757
Mercedes-Benz A-Class - 3,698
Mercedes-Benz C-Class - 6,856
Mercedes-Benz CLA-Class - 3,279
Volvo 60-Series - 2406

Furthermore, keep in mind that the average Lexus buyer is a loyal lot & they tend to keep their Lexus vehicles more so than owners from other luxury car brands.

"Lexus has two cars that made the list. The Lexus IS 300 came in third place and the Lexus GS 300 came in seventh place. Both of these Lexus luxury cars were sedans, and the latest models of these cars are currently starting in the $40,000 to $50,000 price range. iSeeCars says that about 8% of IS 300 owners were long-term owners, while 7.1% of GS 300 owners were long-term owners.

https://www.motorbiscuit.com/these-are-the-luxury-cars-people-keep-the-longest/


5. Lexus (Average 6.8 years)
Lexus is known for their reliability and high resale value, but also has a reputation for offering the latest in safety and technology. We found Lexus clients tend to upgrade after 6.8 years with 28% keeping the vehicle for over 10 years and 49% replacing it in under 5 years.

https://cartelligent.com/blog/how-long-do-people-keep-different-car-brands/#:~:text=Lexus (Average 6.8 years),it in under 5 years.
 

internalaudit

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Sorry, but forecasts show that electric vehicles will still represent a small percentage of the total of global/U.S. car sales.

"The number of EVs on U.S. roads is projected to reach 18.7 million in 2030, up from 1 million at the end of 2018. This is about 7 percent of the 259 million vehicles (cars and light trucks) expected to be on U.S. roads in 2030. "

https://www.eei.org/resourcesandmedia/energytalk/Pages/Issue-In-Depth-11-1-2018.html#:~:text=Additional highlights from the EEI,on U.S. roads in 2030.



Your statement hold very little merit, especially considering that the dated 3rd generation IS has been around for 7+ years and yet it's still competitive sales wise in the luxury small car segment.

Also take a look at Infinti's archaic Q50, which has also been around for 7+ years, but has the 3rd highest sales numbers (YTD 2020) in the luxury small car segment.

Acura ILX - 2,741
Acura TLX - 5,484
Alfa Romeo Giulia - 1759
Audi A3 - 2,238
Audi A4 - 3,950
Audi A5 - 5,320
BMW 2-Series - 1,772
BMW 3-Series - 10,613
BMW 4-Series - 2,198
BMW i3 - 64
Cadillac ATS - 47
Cadillac CT4 - 40
Cadillac CT5 - 3,000
Genesis G70 - 2,074
Infiniti Q50 - 5,575
Infiniti Q60 - 927
Jaguar XE - 0
Lexus CT - 0
Lexus IS - 2,712
Lexus RC - 757
Mercedes-Benz A-Class - 3,698
Mercedes-Benz C-Class - 6,856
Mercedes-Benz CLA-Class - 3,279
Volvo 60-Series - 2406

Furthermore, keep in mind that the average Lexus buyer is a loyal lot & they tend to keep their Lexus vehicles more so than owners from other luxury car brands.

"Lexus has two cars that made the list. The Lexus IS 300 came in third place and the Lexus GS 300 came in seventh place. Both of these Lexus luxury cars were sedans, and the latest models of these cars are currently starting in the $40,000 to $50,000 price range. iSeeCars says that about 8% of IS 300 owners were long-term owners, while 7.1% of GS 300 owners were long-term owners.

https://www.motorbiscuit.com/these-are-the-luxury-cars-people-keep-the-longest/


5. Lexus (Average 6.8 years)
Lexus is known for their reliability and high resale value, but also has a reputation for offering the latest in safety and technology. We found Lexus clients tend to upgrade after 6.8 years with 28% keeping the vehicle for over 10 years and 49% replacing it in under 5 years.

https://cartelligent.com/blog/how-long-do-people-keep-different-car-brands/#:~:text=Lexus (Average 6.8 years),it in under 5 years.
I'm looking for a decent performing AWD BEV with electric motor torque vectoring. I am not going to wait for a $40k CAD BEV as that will be full of compromises. Got to pay to play.

You are out to lunch if you think people are going to buy this in 2028, when $10-15k more could get you a much nicer performing BEV from Toyota, Lexus, Honda, Volvo, Audi, Porsche, BMW, Mercedes.

Business should be forward looking if they want to survive an industry shake-up. Not base everything on current ICEV numbers.

IF your original post said 2024/25, I would have whole-heartedly agreed with you. But your eight years A-OK because of 8-speed transmission and fresh interior are an over-exaggeration that needs to be called out.
 
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I'm looking for a decent performing BEV.
Good for you! Nevertheless, the average consumer purchasing a vehicle in 2020 doesn't share your same sentiment.

You are out to lunch if you think people are going to buy this in 2028, when $10k more could get you a much nicer performing BEV.
Keep dreaming! No matter what you think, BEV's in 2028 will still be a niche vehicle in a niche market & your short sided rhetoric isn't going to change that.

LMAO
 
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internalaudit

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Good for you! Nevertheless, the average consumer purchasing a vehicle 2020 doesn't share your same sentiment.



Keep dreaming! No matter what you think, BEV's in 2028 will still be a niche vehicle in a niche market & your short sided rhetoric isn't going to change that.

LMAO
I'm not dreaming. Willing to pay $80k CAD for an AWD BEV with torque vectoring. I'm going to wait until 2025/26. If not, can easily pick up a used Taycan 4S anyway, with lots of depreciation.

Maybe the masses, such as yourself, can keep dreaming lol. As I said, I'm willing to pay to play.

To my ignore list you go for exaggeration and lack of value/content.
 
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I'm not dreaming. Willing to pay $80k CAD for an AWD BEV with torque vectoring. I'm going to wait until 2025/26. If not, can easily pick up a used Taycan 4S anyway, with lots of depreciation.
Blah, blah, blah!

Maybe the masses, such as yourself, can keep dreaming lol. As I said, I'm willing to pay to play.
Sorry loser, but "the masses" you're looking down on are the primary buyers of the IS. 😄


To my ignore list you go for exaggeration and lack of value/content.
Good riddance, idiot!
 

Gecko

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It is true, I don't see BEVs entirely killing ICEVs. BEVs will grow, but at some unknown point (50/50?), both will cohabit for a quite long time, if not on the same continent, at least on planet Earth.
I very much agree. I believe it is Toyota who has said they see a future with many different powertrain options for different uses: PHEV, BEV, hybrid, gasoline, etc. I think there is a small but vocal group of people who are excited about BEV ownership but most of the folks I know aren't ready yet. Some of them have already had a BEV and experienced range drop, range anxiety or limitations with long distance travel and have gone back to ICE.

I think BEVs have a very bright future, but I think the time where we say it's what "most shoppers want" is quite a ways in the future.
 

ssun30

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In the best case scenario BEV PHEV EREV and FCV combined will account for 30% global market share by 2030 ('30/30 goal') and that's projection in 2018 when NEV growth was at peak. Now that China has slowed down the 30/30 is increasingly unlikely. The global supply chain is not ready for that kind of volume. On the other hand ICEV will be increasingly replaced by HV and have lower market share than HV by 2030.

Some of them have already had a BEV and experienced range drop, range anxiety or limitations with long distance travel and have gone back to ICE.
I'm one of them and I only owned a PHV (but have driven a lot of mileage on BEV too). You might remember in 2017 I was all hyped up for electric vehicles and was one of those who claim 'people only want EV' and sold mine 6 months later 🤣 Only I didn't go back to ICE but to hybrid, and I don't regret that switch (too much).
 
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krew

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Agree. Buying a luxury car is really a non-sensible purchase, but the consumer's emotion is a very powerful "business case". This however is built over time from the brand continually creating excitement through an exciting and competitive product portfolio...
This is where I'm at, personally. There's no reason to buy a luxury car these days outside of aspiration or excitement, and Lexus is lacking in both outside of the LC. Mainstream cars are just so good now.
 

suxeL

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This is where I'm at, personally. There's no reason to buy a luxury car these days outside of aspiration or excitement, and Lexus is lacking in both outside of the LC. Mainstream cars are just so good now.
The highlander platinum has been nothing short of near Lexus. 360 cameras, Toyota Safety tech 3.0, 12.3 HD screen, central expansive TFT display, Torque vectoring. the only thing lacking is cabin noise.
 
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I honesty don't think Lexus will bother adding the twin turbo v6 out of the LS 500. This car will get the axe or a complete ground up redesign on the TNGA platform by 2024.

They would price themselves out of the market and not sell many more cars.
 

internalaudit

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This is where I'm at, personally. There's no reason to buy a luxury car these days outside of aspiration or excitement, and Lexus is lacking in both outside of the LC. Mainstream cars are just so good now.
True. I know many here still prefer ICE but the only time I would go for brand new luxury cars ($70k CAD or higher) is when they're BEVs with electric torque vectoring and with longer battery warranties. After learning to DIY a few things here and there, the ICE still requires more babying to keep it running in tiptop condition. Also, because I'm frugal, I don't do a lot of spirited highway driving. That will change with BEVs lol.

At least I know with fewer parts, a BEV (outside of a Tesla) can probably easily last a few decades.

It's likely just my personal psychology/belieft that I don't want to pony up $5k/year on premium gasoline and would rather pay a $15-25k premium upfront to foregot that expenditure in a BEV because I do keep my cars for much longer than the typically 6-7 years.
 

Faisal Sheikh

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'Drive' is jumping to conclusion saying it will be the 2UR engine. 2UR engine is not a mass produced engine for large volumes and probably have only 1 or 2 years left. IS500 would be in-line with the LS500 sharing the same TT V6 with probably a slightly detuned engine making around 380 - 400 HP. That is what my guess is.
 
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