2020 Lexus RC F Track Edition & Updated 2020 RC F Coupe [MERGED]

Faisal Sheikh

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Next RC with no Frankenstein comprising
Coming from an actual RCF owner, it is not a compromise at all. End result is a brilliant chassis that handles extreme loads with high torsional rigidity. The entire chassis is constructed as a unibody just like any other chassis. Just the initial design was using existing three chassis to make one out of it since a brand new platform would have costed more.

The extra weight is due to extra chassis rigidity over and above what a normal performance based chassis would be. The reason for that is, the original plan was to make a convertible without the need for added reinforcements (since the chassis/B-pillar are not there on the Convertible). Still, that extra chassis rigidity makes the car far more confidence inspiring at the limit. The added weight is not because of the Frankenstein chassis, but because a convertible was planned as well.
 

Faisal Sheikh

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https://www.automobilemag.com/news/2020-lexus-rc-f-track-edition-first-drive-review/

The Lexus RC F Track Edition Deserves the Name




We go for a few hot laps in the most aggressive Lexus since the LFA.
By: Nelson Ireson Photography by: The Manufacturer April 4, 2019PreviousThe Track Edition’s extra diet consisted mostly of reducing rotational and unsprung masses, which pay off even more than sprung mass in terms of dynamics. The biggest single weight savings comes from Brembo carbon-ceramic rotors, which drop a total of 48.5 pounds compared to the steel units. An additional 1.5 pounds are saved at each corner by the fitment of 19-inch forged BBS wheels based on those of the RC F GT3 race car. Titanium exhaust components save another 15 pounds, mostly at the rear of the car, and carbon fiber is used in several additional places to save weight and add rigidity, the roof, hood, and rear bulkhead brace being the primary components.
But it’s not all about weight, even for a Track Edition car. If you want to go fast, you need power, and the RC F Track Edition has it by the bucketful. Lexus claims the Track sports the best power-to-weight ratio in its segment, with 472 horsepower and a claimed curb weight of 3,781 pounds returning a figure of eight pounds per pony. Yet despite its power-to-weight figure and despite Lexus shortening the final-drive ratio from 2.97 to 3.13, the sensation of power delivery is more gradual than explosive, largely because the RC F is powered by a normally aspirated V-8 instead of using forced induction like its competition. The engine unleashes its might with a pleasing rise and peak that combines with a glorious sound to make for an exciting on-track experience, even if it does lack some of the low-end shove of the torquier turbos. The RC F Track Edition’s meaty V-8 is rated for just 395 lb-ft of torque.


Driving the Track Edition back-to-back with the standard 2020 RC F at The Thermal Club near Palm Springs, California, was eye-opening. The updates to the 2020 model make even the standard RC F a friendlier and livelier dance partner, but the Track Edition upgrades take the RC F from track-capable to track-ready. The difference is immediately apparent and appreciated even more after a few laps have heat-soaked the brakes and left the standard car’s pedal feeling long and soft, even if they’re still plenty able to stop the car. The Track Edition’s upgraded brakes are indefatigable, and the carbon rotors and beefy (yet lightweight) six-piston front Brembo calipers make the car much more confidence-inspiring on the track, while retuned brake-pedal travel improves precision in application.

On track the power is ample, and the rear is always ready to rotate the nose toward the apex at turn-in, a tendency that’s easier to modulate this time around thanks to the almost perfectly linear throttle mapping—there’s no more artificially boosted throttle application in Sport+ mode. Likewise, the steering is neither too light nor too heavy, and inputs yield the expected outputs, with enough feel to have confidence in pushing the front end toward its grip limit. In all, the RC F Track Edition feels like it belongs on track as much as any other luxury sport coupe in its price range, and that’s quite a compliment, considering it shares space with the BMW M4 Competition and AMG C63 S.
Unfortunately, despite the images you see here, there weren’t enough cars yet built for us to also get drive time on public roads, so we can’t tell you how that track-tuned strength translates to the street, or if it’s a detriment to the overall comfort, quietness, and long-haul steadiness of the regular RC F. Hopefully we’ll get another crack at it soon—and for a much longer stint.

Until then, we’ll leave it at this: Our short drive indicates the 2020 Lexus RC F Track Edition is the RC F you’ve been waiting for. If you have the $97,675 burning a hole in your pocket, you won’t have to wait long. The additional cars we hoped would be at the event are now rolling off the assembly line and will be hitting dealerships soon.
 

zeusus

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^^ Yessir. Though let's be honest, this talk was relevant because this is how so many non-LEs think when they see this car.
And non-LEs also pissed on the LFA until Jeremy Clarkson said it was hands down his favorite super car of all time. Who cares about what they think, as they clearly cannot think for themselves.

Hopefully someone can make a distinct argument for what exactly the RCF Track Edition is missing for the price offered.
 

Faisal Sheikh

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Interestingly, my RCF Invidia full catback exhaust with titanium burnt blue tips is louder than the track edition RCF titanium exhaust. Maybe, it is because of the strict emissions standard Lexus is following. This video still does not do justice to how it sounds in real life. Many more textures and layers. Plus, it is making around 500 HP.

p.s. As from the chatter, there were flock of boys and girls from the shop that came out to make videos as soon as my RCF came out of the garage


 
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ssun30

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But I was taken by surprise how you said you aren't a car enthusiast by any means.
I'm just not the stereotypical 'I WANT FAST CARS GIVE ME ALL THE POWER!" enthusiast. My hobby is offroading (used to do amateur rallying) and in that respect I am very upset with Toyota's recent strategies with their BOF vehicles and you know I always criticize them for that. I also hypermile all the time which some say is a branch of car enthusiasts.

But even then I genuinely think the RC-F TE is an underwhelming performance car especially for a limited edition.

I will bring up my view to all this electrification mess that manufacturers are rushing to, and that I strongly believe hybrids are the future and not EV's.
It's a long story that is irrelevant to this thread, but you are right the near future belongs to hybrids. However here it's just a terminology thing, in the EV industry when we are talking about EVs we include all types of electrified vehicles (HEV/PHV/EREV/BEV/FCV). We don't really care which type wins in the end because they all buy motors, power electronics, batteries, wiring, all the stuff.
 

F1 Silver Arrows

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I'm just not the stereotypical 'I WANT FAST CARS GIVE ME ALL THE POWER!" enthusiast. My hobby is offroading (used to do amateur rallying) and in that respect I am very upset with Toyota's recent strategies with their BOF vehicles and you know I always criticize them for that. I also hypermile all the time which some say is a branch of car enthusiasts.

But even then I genuinely think the RC-F TE is an underwhelming performance car especially for a limited edition.


It's a long story that is irrelevant to this thread, but you are right the near future belongs to hybrids. However here it's just a terminology thing, in the EV industry when we are talking about EVs we include all types of electrified vehicles (HEV/PHV/EREV/BEV/FCV). We don't really care which type wins in the end because they all buy motors, power electronics, batteries, wiring, all the stuff.
Bro then you shouldn't say you aren't a car enthusiast because to me what you just said SCREAMS as a true car enthusiast. Those people who you mentioned are F&F 13 year olds with access to the parents' internet, goes and comments on YouTube about how the new Supra needed a 25 year old 2JZ with 1000 horsepower out of the gate and the STU STU STU STU STUUUUUUU. No. I call those people overprivileged, petulant with extremely high (and dumb) expectations, and most of all, whiny children who have no understanding of the automotive industry or simply how cars as a whole work. In short, I just call them idiots.

Car enthusiasts come in many forms, and your passions are sure as hell special. Hell, I even love off-roading and the fact that you said you used to do amateur rallying is beast status. PERIOD.

I appreciate your final paragraph. Have any sort of future but it has to be involved with electric power. Now that's smart! There is nothing wrong with electric power, and if there are a lot of flaws with them, their issues are decreasing like no other. For fuel economy, range, lack of pollution, maintenance and most of all, performance, I would just go with hybrid power.
 
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Faisal Sheikh

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I tried build on both at lexus.com and here is what I discovered:

1 - RCF weighs 3900 lbs (3780 lbs for the track edition)
2 - Standard RCF now has more packages available and more stand alone options
3 - Carbon Performance package is a $11,300 option with a long list of features, but no TVD.
4 - TVD is only available as a stand-alone option on the standard RCF.
5 - RCF track edition only has one option package available, which is the nav package.
6 - The 19 inch 20 spoke polished wheels are optional on the standard RCF. No 10 spoke option anymore (I hated the design so good they got rid of them). Track edition has its own lightweight wheels.

Edit: Corrected MPS4S tires are standard across all versions of the 2020 RCF.
 
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Motor

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The Top Gear USA car review: Lexus RC F
Not just as good as an M4 to drive, which it never was, it’s quite possibly better

For:
RC F finally gets the throttle-steering manners we’ve always wanted

Against:
You have to pay a big premium for Track Edition model

Verdict
It’s fair to say we didn’t pull any punches when we drove the first RC F. We hoped it would be a chip off the hallowed LFA block and it wasn’t. Yes, it had a superb naturally aspirated V8 engine and its build quality was fabulous. But it understeered like a limo and ate tyres like a child eats raisinettes. The clever chassis systems did their best to hide all of this on the street, but they simply couldn’t on the track. And we made sure everyone knew that.

But with this 2020 edition of the car, and let’s focus on the limited edition TE version – there will be just 50 available in the US in 2019 – Lexus has shown it hasn’t forgotten what we want from a sports coupe. It now makes a thunderous noise, does 0-60mph in under four seconds, has launch control but, best of all, it can be steered not just by the wheel but by the throttle, too. It’s now not just as good as an M4 to drive, which it never was, it’s quite possibly better.
https://www.topgear.com/car-reviews/usa/lexus/rc-f/verdict
 

PeterF

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Nice car, fast, great sound, probably great for the road, but not really suited for the track (lots of understeer and eats tires). So, why call it a "track edition." Is it worth the extra $35,000 over the base RC F? With only 50 being produced, a few wealthy major Lexus enthusiasts will get one. but IMHO it's overpriced compared with both the RC F base and with its competitors (like M4 and C63 S). PS [I like the earlier review that included complaints from the Lexus engineers. Lexus could have done much better, and that is the somewhat frustrating issue] However, the RCF remains an excellent car.
 
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Please Lexus you better make a next gen RC or next gen compact Lexus coupe replacement. I hope that there turbocharged six cylinder and a convertible offer the next time. Also please make the next F compact coupe have over 500 hp and less weight. I hope that V8 stays even if it’s turbocharged.
 

Motor

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2020 Lexus RC F Track Edition Review: Lighter and Louder
Lexus builds the most exciting RC to date

Production is limited to 400 units globally, with just 50 coming to the United States. Each one is priced at $97,675.

And with that, naysayers will have plenty of ammo. They'll likely point out that the standard 2020 RC F is almost $32,000 cheaper yet shares many of the Track Edition's upgrades, including launch control and the new tires, engine and drivetrain tweaks—and the standard RC F offers TVD. Based on the short time we had with both cars, they'll say the Track Edition, although fun and engaging to drive, doesn't feel much different from the normal RC F, making them wish for things like wider and stickier tires, stiffer suspension, or more supportive seats. Really F it up. We're ready for it.
https://www.motortrend.com/cars/lexus/rc/2020/2020-lexus-rc-f-track-edition-review/
 

Faisal Sheikh

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https://www.theglobeandmail.com/drive/reviews/article-poised-and-polished-the-lexus-rc-f-track-edition-proves-tuning-is/



Poised and polished, the Lexus RC-F Track Edition proves tuning is about more than big numbers


BRENDAN MCALEER
This is not a car for accountants. The numbers simply don’t make sense. At $119,950, the RC-F Track Edition is more expensive than most of its competition; its tires are the same width as the normal RC-F; the naturally-aspirated engine produces less torque than turbocharged rivals – 20 per cent less than a C63 AMG; and despite wearing more carbon-fibre jewellery than a Fast & Furious extra, it still weighs a hefty 1,715 kg.

Despite the wings and the carbon-fibre hood, this machine is clearly built only for Lexus fans. Or perhaps, judging by the front end, waffle-maker enthusiasts. But toss those spreadsheets out the window, fellow specifications nerds. Hardly anyone is going to buy this car, but every single one of them is going to get an eight-cylinder haiku penned to the joy of driving.

First, let's take a red pen to the Track package's considerable $34,950 premium over the base RC-F. Immediately you can knock $11,000 off the bill, as that's what you'd pay for the optional performance package you want anyway. Next, draw a circle around the words “carbon ceramic brakes.” Other brands charge upwards of $10,000 for these as an option.

Suddenly, the Track Edition starts looking like, if not exactly a bargain, then at least less of an irrational extravagance. For one-of-ten levels of exclusivity, you could do worse.

For a driving experience, you’d be hard-pressed to do better. There are of course faster options – the last time I was on this racetrack was with the Camaro ZL1, which was easily 20-30 km/h faster down the front straight – but not many to match the RC-F’s poise and polish.
Credit first goes to the jewel-like V-8, which revs as though a team of Japanese swordsmiths have spent months hammering out every impurity. Like the rest of the car, it feels forge-strong and mirror-smooth.

The Track Edition boasts unflappable carbon ceramic brakes.

BRENDAN MCALEER
The next accolades must go to Lexus’s team of engineers, who have honed the RC-F with an exacting precision. While the weight savings totals only 65 kg versus the normal 2020 RC-F, the Track Edition sheds unsprung weight thanks to those ceramic brakes and lightweight 19-inch wheels.

To give an idea of how effective reducing unsprung weight is, imagine trying to run a race in steel-toe workboots. With all four corners unweighted, the RC-F’s steering is lighter and more communicative, it glides over rough sections of track more easily and reacts more quickly to transitions.

The eight-speed automatic offers quicker shifting than in previous years. Like the standard RC-F, the Track Edition offers selectable driving modes, and while traction control can be mostly turned off, there’s still an electronic safety net if you make a really big mistake.

Five-time Rolex 24 winner Scott Pruett, long a Lexus development driver, summed up the RC-F succinctly. “When I was driving for BMW, sometimes everything they gave you was a hammer. This is more a scalpel.”


Yet you need not be a racing surgeon to extract the Track Edition’s potential. The V-8 provides smooth power at corner exit, with no need to manage the surge in torque you get from a turbocharged engine. The brakes are faithful and unflappable. The overall balance is neutral and friendly. Throttle-steering the car through a tight left-hander is really good fun.

The experience is accessible but still rewards consistent, tidy driving behaviour. It’s the type of car in which a student will grow to become a better driver.

It will not be possible to explain why this car is such a well-sorted driving machine to your accountant. Nor will you be able to make much headway arguing your case to anyone wearing a BMW or Tesla-branded hat.

But if the numbers don't make sense, they do add up. The RC-F Track Edition is not some stripped-out purist's special, but a sharper variant of an already surprisingly good car. That makes it special.



YOU’LL LIKE THIS CAR IF ...
You’re looking for an all-rounder that combines true track ability with impeccable build quality.




BRENDAN MCALEER/THE GLOBE AND MAIL
More suited to midnight in Tokyo than the parking lot at the office, the Track Edition is certifiably crazy-looking. At least it’s all functional: the quad-exhaust tips are lightweight titanium, the fixed rear wing provides 26 kg of downforce, and all those vents and intakes actually channel air.


BRENDAN MCALEER
On the inside, there are few differences between the standard RC-F and the Track Edition. The latter loses the cooled seats and has a manually adjustable steering wheel. Both insides are a little dated when compared to more modern Lexus products like the LC 500.




Performance
Both the Track Edition and the standard RC-F get a new, higher final drive ratio and a mild bump to a total of 472 hp. 0-100 km/h times should be just over four seconds. If the Track Edition’s be-spoilered look is too much for you, note that the standard 2020 RC-F is 15 kg lighter than the 2019 model and has a torque-vectoring rear differential to help in the corners. (The Track Edition has only a standard limited-slip to save weight.)




Technology
Lexus’s touchpad and screen technology feels a little behind the times on first introduction but is perfectly functional.




Cargo
A new carbon-fibre brace cuts down on the Track Edition’s pass-through space, but trunk space remains useful at 287 litres.




The verdict: 8.5
An often overlooked entrant in the competitive sport sedan segment, this new sharp-edged variant of the RC-F proves that tuning is about more than just posting up big numbers.
 
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