JapanLexus IS: Third GenerationRumors

Next-Generation Lexus IS Sedan to Grow in Size?

Lexus IS Next-Gen Sketch

According to Japanese magazine Mag-X, the next-generation Lexus IS will debut in 2020 as a much larger sedan, with dimensions closer to the GS than the current IS model.

Using the numbers from the article, let’s make a comparison table with the IS old & new, the GS sedan, and the LC coupe for good measure:

Model Wheelbase Length Width Height
New IS 2870 mm (113 in) 4730 mm (186.2 in) 1815 mm (71.5 in) 1425 mm (56.1 in)
Current IS 2,800 mm (110.2 in) 4,681 mm (184.3 in) 1,810 mm (71.3 in) 1,430 mm (56.3 in)
Current GS 2,850 mm (112.2 in) 4,879 mm (192.1 in) 1,840 mm (72.4 in) 1,455 mm (57.3 in)
Current LC 2,870 mm (113.0 in) 4,760 mm (187.4 in) 1,920 mm (75.6 in) 1,345 mm (53.0 in)

If the Mag-X dimensions are correct, the next-gen IS could have a longer wheelbase and shorter overall length than the GS sedan. This discrepancy could mean shorter front & rear overhangs due to the adoption of the GA-L platform from the LC & LS.

The article suggests a new 2.4L four-cylinder turbo and a 2.5L hybrid as engine options, but there’s no mention of the 400+ horsepower IS 450 that was rumored a couple weeks back. Mag-X also throws in an IS F with the same 4.0L twin-turbo V8 that’s supposed to power the LC F coupe.

Here’s the full page from Mag-X, if anyone wants to translate the article in the comments:

Lexus IS Mag-X Full Page

Comments
R
  • R
    RRR
  • July 12, 2018
Wishful thinking as conservative as Lexus/Toyota is I'm hoping for a IS400 or IS450 model with a 3.5 v6 twin turbo for the next generation, and for the return of the IS-F with a 4.0 v8 that is rumoured to be in the LC-F. And I think Lexus needs to offer more individual options like the Germans, I really don't like that there is only 3 packages available for the F Sport and non F Sport. If I'm spending over $50k on a vehicle I want more individual options to suit my needs. Isn't that where auto manufacturers make the most profits, in options?
R
  • R
    RRR
  • July 12, 2018
Wishful thinking as conservative as Lexus/Toyota is I'm hoping for a IS400 or IS450 model with a 3.5 v6 twin turbo for the next generation, and for the return of the IS-F with a 4.0 v8 that is rumoured to be in the LC-F. And I think Lexus needs to offer more individual options like the Germans, I really don't like that there is only 3 packages available for the F Sport and non F Sport. If I'm spending over $50k on a vehicle I want more individual options to suit my needs. Isn't that where auto manufacturers make the most profits, in options?
S
Joaquin Ruhi
Two things worth keeping in mind:

1) In the declining North American mid-size sedan market, it seems that each major Japanese carmaker is staking out a unique niche for itself, with only a bare handful of rivals. Toyota's Camry is almost the sole remaining midsize to offer a V6 option (alongside Ford Fusion Sport). Honda Accord has the broadest variety of clutch-pedal manual transmission offerings (on both 1.5-liter and 2-liter Sport models). And AWD options for the new-for-2019 Nissan Altima are rivaled only by Ford and Subaru. Could the latter move, if successful, spur Toyota to offer an AWD option on Camry?

2) The 5th-generation Toyota RAV4 debuting in a few months marks both a move to the latest Camry/Avalon/ES TNGA-K platform and Dynamic Torque Vectoring AWD. And, for the 2020 model year, its larger Toyota Highlander sibling follows in its footsteps. Could these renovated models (plus the AWD-optional Sienna minivan due for its own transition to TNGA-K around the same time) create enough critical mass to make an AWD option for some if not all the TNGA-K sedans a more viable and profitable proposition?
1) Possibly. It could make Toyota think twice and offer an AWD format for the Camry/Avalon. If Camry/Avalon get AWD, ES will follow suit. But I would still tread lightly on this point. It really depends on how well the Altima sells overall and how much of those units are AWD. If the Altima, even with an AWD model, doesn't even break close to Camry numbers. Toyota will still edge it out and refuse to offer an AWD option. Because they are still net profiting high sales w/o the AWD.
The only way I see Camry/Avalon/ES having AWD is if the demand is there. Sadly - there is no demand for this. The Camry/Avalon/ES base doesn't crave this.
Due to the TNGA-K, Toyota can bring AWD at anytime. The biggest question is if they will. My money is no.

2) Interesting point. You still have to see if its profitable to make AWD versions of each specific car. I don't believe Toyota will add something to a car because they have the ability to do so. Toyota will do it when they feel like its time or their research says so. You can see this pattern throughout their line-up. They have done some things that seem slow and questionable in car enthusiasts eyes but it draws big dollar.
If Toyota's research concludes that Camry/Avalon/ES would benefit from an AWD, they will add it.

RRR
Wishful thinking as conservative as Lexus/Toyota is I'm hoping for a IS400 or IS450 model with a 3.5 v6 twin turbo for the next generation, and for the return of the IS-F with a 4.0 v8 that is rumoured to be in the LC-F. And I think Lexus needs to offer more individual options like the Germans, I really don't like that there is only 3 packages available for the F Sport and non F Sport. If I'm spending over $50k on a vehicle I want more individual options to suit my needs. Isn't that where auto manufacturers make the most profits, in options?
Based off my experience as a long time Toyota investor - I agree - that is definitely wishful thinking.

Toyota's business model is very conservative and unique. They want to milk the hell out of something before even considering replacing it or "improving it". The engines in the 2G Lexus IS was used for 10 years plus before Toyota was like "Okay. Lets change it."

Personally - I wish there is a Lexus IS400 or 450 too. That would make it a C43 AMG, 340i, S4, and Q50 RS competitor. But do I think it will happen? Probably not. Toyota cares about the profit margin. They know majority of Lexus IS sales are base engine models. The question is - would it be worth it for them to develop a TTV6 for the Lexus IS for low returns. Would it please enthusiasts? Yes. Would it please share holders? Probably not.

Second thing to keep in mind - we are in a SUV crazed market. With the UX coming out and the rumored high end crossover being in the pipeline, Lexus is probably more focused on SUVs rather than high-performance Sedans.

Last thing to keep in mind is that Lexus recently said they don't want to keep their line-up bloated like their German rivals. This means - they are more likely to cut models than add models. And when Lexus add models - it'll likely be profitable models (SUVs and Hybrids perhaps). Lexus getting on the EV train is likely as well.

Regarding your last comment - yes/no. It depends how you look at it. Yes - the vehicles tend to be more expensive when you have to add individual options in order to build it - like Mercedes Benz.
However - when you do fix packages - that's where the real money comes in. Because when you let people do options - they can option it just the 2-3 things they like. When the packages are fixed, they can offer a much of stuff in one package (some you might not want) for a higher price. Take a look how the Lexus ES is tiered.
S
Joaquin Ruhi
Two things worth keeping in mind:

1) In the declining North American mid-size sedan market, it seems that each major Japanese carmaker is staking out a unique niche for itself, with only a bare handful of rivals. Toyota's Camry is almost the sole remaining midsize to offer a V6 option (alongside Ford Fusion Sport). Honda Accord has the broadest variety of clutch-pedal manual transmission offerings (on both 1.5-liter and 2-liter Sport models). And AWD options for the new-for-2019 Nissan Altima are rivaled only by Ford and Subaru. Could the latter move, if successful, spur Toyota to offer an AWD option on Camry?

2) The 5th-generation Toyota RAV4 debuting in a few months marks both a move to the latest Camry/Avalon/ES TNGA-K platform and Dynamic Torque Vectoring AWD. And, for the 2020 model year, its larger Toyota Highlander sibling follows in its footsteps. Could these renovated models (plus the AWD-optional Sienna minivan due for its own transition to TNGA-K around the same time) create enough critical mass to make an AWD option for some if not all the TNGA-K sedans a more viable and profitable proposition?
1) Possibly. It could make Toyota think twice and offer an AWD format for the Camry/Avalon. If Camry/Avalon get AWD, ES will follow suit. But I would still tread lightly on this point. It really depends on how well the Altima sells overall and how much of those units are AWD. If the Altima, even with an AWD model, doesn't even break close to Camry numbers. Toyota will still edge it out and refuse to offer an AWD option. Because they are still net profiting high sales w/o the AWD.
The only way I see Camry/Avalon/ES having AWD is if the demand is there. Sadly - there is no demand for this. The Camry/Avalon/ES base doesn't crave this.
Due to the TNGA-K, Toyota can bring AWD at anytime. The biggest question is if they will. My money is no.

2) Interesting point. You still have to see if its profitable to make AWD versions of each specific car. I don't believe Toyota will add something to a car because they have the ability to do so. Toyota will do it when they feel like its time or their research says so. You can see this pattern throughout their line-up. They have done some things that seem slow and questionable in car enthusiasts eyes but it draws big dollar.
If Toyota's research concludes that Camry/Avalon/ES would benefit from an AWD, they will add it.

RRR
Wishful thinking as conservative as Lexus/Toyota is I'm hoping for a IS400 or IS450 model with a 3.5 v6 twin turbo for the next generation, and for the return of the IS-F with a 4.0 v8 that is rumoured to be in the LC-F. And I think Lexus needs to offer more individual options like the Germans, I really don't like that there is only 3 packages available for the F Sport and non F Sport. If I'm spending over $50k on a vehicle I want more individual options to suit my needs. Isn't that where auto manufacturers make the most profits, in options?
Based off my experience as a long time Toyota investor - I agree - that is definitely wishful thinking.

Toyota's business model is very conservative and unique. They want to milk the hell out of something before even considering replacing it or "improving it". The engines in the 2G Lexus IS was used for 10 years plus before Toyota was like "Okay. Lets change it."

Personally - I wish there is a Lexus IS400 or 450 too. That would make it a C43 AMG, 340i, S4, and Q50 RS competitor. But do I think it will happen? Probably not. Toyota cares about the profit margin. They know majority of Lexus IS sales are base engine models. The question is - would it be worth it for them to develop a TTV6 for the Lexus IS for low returns. Would it please enthusiasts? Yes. Would it please share holders? Probably not.

Second thing to keep in mind - we are in a SUV crazed market. With the UX coming out and the rumored high end crossover being in the pipeline, Lexus is probably more focused on SUVs rather than high-performance Sedans.

Last thing to keep in mind is that Lexus recently said they don't want to keep their line-up bloated like their German rivals. This means - they are more likely to cut models than add models. And when Lexus add models - it'll likely be profitable models (SUVs and Hybrids perhaps). Lexus getting on the EV train is likely as well.

Regarding your last comment - yes/no. It depends how you look at it. Yes - the vehicles tend to be more expensive when you have to add individual options in order to build it - like Mercedes Benz.
However - when you do fix packages - that's where the real money comes in. Because when you let people do options - they can option it just the 2-3 things they like. When the packages are fixed, they can offer a much of stuff in one package (some you might not want) for a higher price. Take a look how the Lexus ES is tiered.
S
Joaquin Ruhi
Two things worth keeping in mind:

1) In the declining North American mid-size sedan market, it seems that each major Japanese carmaker is staking out a unique niche for itself, with only a bare handful of rivals. Toyota's Camry is almost the sole remaining midsize to offer a V6 option (alongside Ford Fusion Sport). Honda Accord has the broadest variety of clutch-pedal manual transmission offerings (on both 1.5-liter and 2-liter Sport models). And AWD options for the new-for-2019 Nissan Altima are rivaled only by Ford and Subaru. Could the latter move, if successful, spur Toyota to offer an AWD option on Camry?

2) The 5th-generation Toyota RAV4 debuting in a few months marks both a move to the latest Camry/Avalon/ES TNGA-K platform and Dynamic Torque Vectoring AWD. And, for the 2020 model year, its larger Toyota Highlander sibling follows in its footsteps. Could these renovated models (plus the AWD-optional Sienna minivan due for its own transition to TNGA-K around the same time) create enough critical mass to make an AWD option for some if not all the TNGA-K sedans a more viable and profitable proposition?
1) Possibly. It could make Toyota think twice and offer an AWD format for the Camry/Avalon. If Camry/Avalon get AWD, ES will follow suit. But I would still tread lightly on this point. It really depends on how well the Altima sells overall and how much of those units are AWD. If the Altima, even with an AWD model, doesn't even break close to Camry numbers. Toyota will still edge it out and refuse to offer an AWD option. Because they are still net profiting high sales w/o the AWD.
The only way I see Camry/Avalon/ES having AWD is if the demand is there. Sadly - there is no demand for this. The Camry/Avalon/ES base doesn't crave this.
Due to the TNGA-K, Toyota can bring AWD at anytime. The biggest question is if they will. My money is no.

2) Interesting point. You still have to see if its profitable to make AWD versions of each specific car. I don't believe Toyota will add something to a car because they have the ability to do so. Toyota will do it when they feel like its time or their research says so. You can see this pattern throughout their line-up. They have done some things that seem slow and questionable in car enthusiasts eyes but it draws big dollar.
If Toyota's research concludes that Camry/Avalon/ES would benefit from an AWD, they will add it.

RRR
Wishful thinking as conservative as Lexus/Toyota is I'm hoping for a IS400 or IS450 model with a 3.5 v6 twin turbo for the next generation, and for the return of the IS-F with a 4.0 v8 that is rumoured to be in the LC-F. And I think Lexus needs to offer more individual options like the Germans, I really don't like that there is only 3 packages available for the F Sport and non F Sport. If I'm spending over $50k on a vehicle I want more individual options to suit my needs. Isn't that where auto manufacturers make the most profits, in options?
Based off my experience as a long time Toyota investor - I agree - that is definitely wishful thinking.

Toyota's business model is very conservative and unique. They want to milk the hell out of something before even considering replacing it or "improving it". The engines in the 2G Lexus IS was used for 10 years plus before Toyota was like "Okay. Lets change it."

Personally - I wish there is a Lexus IS400 or 450 too. That would make it a C43 AMG, 340i, S4, and Q50 RS competitor. But do I think it will happen? Probably not. Toyota cares about the profit margin. They know majority of Lexus IS sales are base engine models. The question is - would it be worth it for them to develop a TTV6 for the Lexus IS for low returns. Would it please enthusiasts? Yes. Would it please share holders? Probably not.

Second thing to keep in mind - we are in a SUV crazed market. With the UX coming out and the rumored high end crossover being in the pipeline, Lexus is probably more focused on SUVs rather than high-performance Sedans.

Last thing to keep in mind is that Lexus recently said they don't want to keep their line-up bloated like their German rivals. This means - they are more likely to cut models than add models. And when Lexus add models - it'll likely be profitable models (SUVs and Hybrids perhaps). Lexus getting on the EV train is likely as well.

Regarding your last comment - yes/no. It depends how you look at it. Yes - the vehicles tend to be more expensive when you have to add individual options in order to build it - like Mercedes Benz.
However - when you do fix packages - that's where the real money comes in. Because when you let people do options - they can option it just the 2-3 things they like. When the packages are fixed, they can offer a much of stuff in one package (some you might not want) for a higher price. Take a look how the Lexus ES is tiered.
Sakura
The thing is - the F-Sport ES and AWD ES won't be able to compete with the E/5 still. Transverses FWD/AWD is holding the ES back.

I'm one of those people on the other side of the fence. The enthusiasts in me wants an AWD ES but the business-sense in me (as I have been investing in Toyota for a long time) is that they won't.
Toyota sees green and that's all they see. If the ES AWD won't produce enough sales for the worth of development, they won't make it. Considering if the AWD the ES, they'll have to AWD the Camry/Avalon too. The question is - will they net profit from giving AWD to 3 vehicles? Is there a demand for it? Previous sales numbers suggest AWD is not an in-demand item for ES. 6ES still gets insane sales.
The F-Sport ES is a good niche. It'll likely lure in younger buyers.
Another reason why Toyota hasn't made many AWD cars may be because they own a 20% stake of Subaru. Since AWD is one of Subaru's main selling points, Toyota may be trying to not step on their toes. I know it's unlikely to happen, but it could be interesting to see an IS with a Subaru-sourced AWD drivetrain. This wouldn't work with some GA-L cars, which I've read are FMR layout, because the engine is always ahead of the front axle on Subaru powertrains.
Sakura
The thing is - the F-Sport ES and AWD ES won't be able to compete with the E/5 still. Transverses FWD/AWD is holding the ES back.

I'm one of those people on the other side of the fence. The enthusiasts in me wants an AWD ES but the business-sense in me (as I have been investing in Toyota for a long time) is that they won't.
Toyota sees green and that's all they see. If the ES AWD won't produce enough sales for the worth of development, they won't make it. Considering if the AWD the ES, they'll have to AWD the Camry/Avalon too. The question is - will they net profit from giving AWD to 3 vehicles? Is there a demand for it? Previous sales numbers suggest AWD is not an in-demand item for ES. 6ES still gets insane sales.
The F-Sport ES is a good niche. It'll likely lure in younger buyers.
Another reason why Toyota hasn't made many AWD cars may be because they own a 20% stake of Subaru. Since AWD is one of Subaru's main selling points, Toyota may be trying to not step on their toes. I know it's unlikely to happen, but it could be interesting to see an IS with a Subaru-sourced AWD drivetrain. This wouldn't work with some GA-L cars, which I've read are FMR layout, because the engine is always ahead of the front axle on Subaru powertrains.
Sakura
The thing is - the F-Sport ES and AWD ES won't be able to compete with the E/5 still. Transverses FWD/AWD is holding the ES back.

I'm one of those people on the other side of the fence. The enthusiasts in me wants an AWD ES but the business-sense in me (as I have been investing in Toyota for a long time) is that they won't.
Toyota sees green and that's all they see. If the ES AWD won't produce enough sales for the worth of development, they won't make it. Considering if the AWD the ES, they'll have to AWD the Camry/Avalon too. The question is - will they net profit from giving AWD to 3 vehicles? Is there a demand for it? Previous sales numbers suggest AWD is not an in-demand item for ES. 6ES still gets insane sales.
The F-Sport ES is a good niche. It'll likely lure in younger buyers.
Another reason why Toyota hasn't made many AWD cars may be because they own a 20% stake of Subaru. Since AWD is one of Subaru's main selling points, Toyota may be trying to not step on their toes. I know it's unlikely to happen, but it could be interesting to see an IS with a Subaru-sourced AWD drivetrain. This wouldn't work with some GA-L cars, which I've read are FMR layout, because the engine is always ahead of the front axle on Subaru powertrains.
TheNerdyPotato
Another reason why Toyota hasn't made many AWD cars may be because they own a 20% stake of Subaru. Since AWD is one of Subaru's main selling points, Toyota may be trying to not step on their toes. I know it's unlikely to happen, but it could be interesting to see an IS with a Subaru-sourced AWD drivetrain. This wouldn't work with some GA-L cars, which I've read are FMR layout, because the engine is always ahead of the front axle on Subaru powertrains.
Subaru could move away from SymmetricAWD with ElectricRWD. But it will likely remain SymmetricFWD, because of its Boxer engine.
TheNerdyPotato
Another reason why Toyota hasn't made many AWD cars may be because they own a 20% stake of Subaru. Since AWD is one of Subaru's main selling points, Toyota may be trying to not step on their toes. I know it's unlikely to happen, but it could be interesting to see an IS with a Subaru-sourced AWD drivetrain. This wouldn't work with some GA-L cars, which I've read are FMR layout, because the engine is always ahead of the front axle on Subaru powertrains.
Subaru could move away from SymmetricAWD with ElectricRWD. But it will likely remain SymmetricFWD, because of its Boxer engine.
TheNerdyPotato
Another reason why Toyota hasn't made many AWD cars may be because they own a 20% stake of Subaru. Since AWD is one of Subaru's main selling points, Toyota may be trying to not step on their toes. I know it's unlikely to happen, but it could be interesting to see an IS with a Subaru-sourced AWD drivetrain. This wouldn't work with some GA-L cars, which I've read are FMR layout, because the engine is always ahead of the front axle on Subaru powertrains.
Subaru could move away from SymmetricAWD with ElectricRWD. But it will likely remain SymmetricFWD, because of its Boxer engine.
S
TheNerdyPotato
Another reason why Toyota hasn't made many AWD cars may be because they own a 20% stake of Subaru. Since AWD is one of Subaru's main selling points, Toyota may be trying to not step on their toes. I know it's unlikely to happen, but it could be interesting to see an IS with a Subaru-sourced AWD drivetrain. This wouldn't work with some GA-L cars, which I've read are FMR layout, because the engine is always ahead of the front axle on Subaru powertrains.
Yes. yes! This. Thank you for pointing this out - I have missed this fact.

Its very true. Toyota has investments in Subaru. Its highly likely they don't want to take away Subaru's market share of AWD. We would still have to calculate the profits to see if Toyota will benefit more from staying away from Subaru's turf.

I also want to add Toyota AWD systems aren't partially good. They are okay at best if I'm honest. Toyota's AWD system just doesn't have the selling power of say a Audi, Acura or Subaru AWD system. This could further deter Toyota away from adding AWD to a lot of their vehicles.
S
TheNerdyPotato
Another reason why Toyota hasn't made many AWD cars may be because they own a 20% stake of Subaru. Since AWD is one of Subaru's main selling points, Toyota may be trying to not step on their toes. I know it's unlikely to happen, but it could be interesting to see an IS with a Subaru-sourced AWD drivetrain. This wouldn't work with some GA-L cars, which I've read are FMR layout, because the engine is always ahead of the front axle on Subaru powertrains.
Yes. yes! This. Thank you for pointing this out - I have missed this fact.

Its very true. Toyota has investments in Subaru. Its highly likely they don't want to take away Subaru's market share of AWD. We would still have to calculate the profits to see if Toyota will benefit more from staying away from Subaru's turf.

I also want to add Toyota AWD systems aren't partially good. They are okay at best if I'm honest. Toyota's AWD system just doesn't have the selling power of say a Audi, Acura or Subaru AWD system. This could further deter Toyota away from adding AWD to a lot of their vehicles.
S
TheNerdyPotato
Another reason why Toyota hasn't made many AWD cars may be because they own a 20% stake of Subaru. Since AWD is one of Subaru's main selling points, Toyota may be trying to not step on their toes. I know it's unlikely to happen, but it could be interesting to see an IS with a Subaru-sourced AWD drivetrain. This wouldn't work with some GA-L cars, which I've read are FMR layout, because the engine is always ahead of the front axle on Subaru powertrains.
Yes. yes! This. Thank you for pointing this out - I have missed this fact.

Its very true. Toyota has investments in Subaru. Its highly likely they don't want to take away Subaru's market share of AWD. We would still have to calculate the profits to see if Toyota will benefit more from staying away from Subaru's turf.

I also want to add Toyota AWD systems aren't partially good. They are okay at best if I'm honest. Toyota's AWD system just doesn't have the selling power of say a Audi, Acura or Subaru AWD system. This could further deter Toyota away from adding AWD to a lot of their vehicles.
krew

Next-Generation Lexus IS Sedan to Grow in Size?
[​IMG]

Mag-X reports a wheelbase bigger than the current GS.
View the original article post
krew

Next-Generation Lexus IS Sedan to Grow in Size?
[​IMG]

Mag-X reports a wheelbase bigger than the current GS.
View the original article post
krew

Next-Generation Lexus IS Sedan to Grow in Size?
[​IMG]

Mag-X reports a wheelbase bigger than the current GS.
View the original article post
TheNerdyPotato
Another reason why Toyota hasn't made many AWD cars may be because they own a 20% stake of Subaru. Since AWD is one of Subaru's main selling points, Toyota may be trying to not step on their toes. I know it's unlikely to happen, but it could be interesting to see an IS with a Subaru-sourced AWD drivetrain. This wouldn't work with some GA-L cars, which I've read are FMR layout, because the engine is always ahead of the front axle on Subaru powertrains.
They had nothing to do with anything. Only reason Toyota didn't make AWD Corolla or Camry before was that they did not seem it worth it.

Toyota also owns Torsen and is overall largest producer of 4x4 systems in the world. Most Japanese Toyotas have some kind of AWD system.
The growth in size is pretty much given. But 4730 mm still sounds a little bit short...
spwolf
They had nothing to do with anything. Only reason Toyota didn't make AWD Corolla or Camry before was that they did not seem it worth it.

Toyota also owns Torsen and is overall largest producer of 4x4 systems in the world. Most Japanese Toyotas have some kind of AWD system.
The Camry will go in that direction very soon anyway, as will the Avalon. The ES will be offered with AWD, starting in December 2018 for Europe and UK. And not to play semantics, but surely you remember the Camry was available with AWD until 1991 and Corolla until 1992.
spwolf
Toyota also owns Torsen and is overall largest producer of 4x4 systems in the world.
Huh, did not know that.
If this Mag-X article turns out to be correct, given that 4IS will share the shorter of 3 available GA-L wheelbases with LC theoretically leaves room for a 5GS that shares the 2920mm (115") wheelbase with the 18th-gen Toyota Crown. That doesn't mean, of course, that there will be a 5GS...
Joaquin Ruhi
If this Mag-X article turns out to be correct, given that 4IS will share the shorter of 3 available GA-L wheelbases with LC theoretically leaves room for a 5GS that shares the 2920mm (115") wheelbase with the 18th-gen Toyota Crown. That doesn't mean, of course, that there will be a 5GS...
Does Mag X have the correct facts, when I have recently pointed out that the GA-L is not shared with the Crown?
Carmaker1
Does Mag X have the correct facts, when I have recently pointed out that the GA-L is not shared with the Crown?
Wow! I'm floored! All along, I was under the impression that Toyota Crown18 shared the GA-L platform with Lexus LC and LS. You mentioned Crown18 being on a TNGA-N platform a few minutes ago on another Lexus Enthusiast thread and was puzzled. But you're absolutely right. The latest update to Wikipedia's Toyota Crown article indeed states that it's on GA-N, and backs that up with this smoking gun: an article on the TNGA platform from [URL="https://prius-news.com/1685.html]Japanese website Prius-News.com[/URL]
Joaquin Ruhi
Wow! I'm floored! All along, I was under the impression that Toyota Crown18 shared the GA-L platform with Lexus LC and LS. You mentioned Crown18 being on a TNGA-N platform a few minutes ago on another Lexus Enthusiast thread and was puzzled. But you're absolutely right. The latest update to Wikipedia's Toyota Crown article indeed states that it's on GA-N, and backs that up with this smoking gun: an article on the TNGA platform from Japanese website Prius-News.com
Ironically, I am the one who corrected that on Wikipedia recently. Because I am guilty of claiming the Crown would debut TNGA-L, when such a thing doesn't seem to exist. Thanks to my being extra proactive with that (since S220 spy shots), a lot of credible sources went with that as valid. My fault honestly, so I am doing clean-up.:blush:
Carmaker1
Ironically, I am the one who corrected that on Wikipedia recently. Because I am guilty of claiming the Crown would debut TNGA-L, when such a thing doesn't seem to exist. Thanks to my being extra proactive with my S220 = TNGA-L (since S220 spy shots) last year, a lot of credible sources wrongfully went with that as valid. My fault honestly, so I am doing clean-up really quickly.:blush:
Ha! For some reason, I had a crazy hunch that you might have been behind that Wikipedia update...
Well it’s about time we get some good news ! The IS is getting larger , I hope that space is in the trunk and the back seat . Then it will be a real revelry between the Germans . Could we please get 350hp and a IS F 400 plus , with a dual clutch and a 50/50 weight distribution . Please !
C
  • C
    CIF
  • July 23, 2018
(TN)GA-N is still an FR platform, and thus similar to GA-L. The older N platform was shared amongst the Crown and GS. Now Toyota has introduced some divergence with GA-L being Lexus specific, and GA-N being for Toyota models like the Crown.

https://newsroom.toyota.co.jp/en/toyota/23102775.html?padid=ag478_from_kv

Toyota's Crown press release clearly confirms this as a TNGA car, thus dispelling any strange notions of this being on the old N platform.
So by this magX new rumor if true
The next IS will be the international luxurious version for the next generation of my beloved Mark-X
Carmaker1
My point is, Toyota don't always make the soundest decisions with product planning and sometimes have to catch themselves, before making final commitments during development stages and even later after launch.
Absolutely, but being part owners of Subaru means nothing to these decisions... even with Daihatsu, they started operating as integrated company only when they folded it into Toyota greater last or year before that.

Cars like Yaris and Corolla have always had awd system in Japan, but product planners likely decided that it is not wanted outside Japan.

Just like for new TNGA platforms, they have now decides that it will be useful to have AWD sedans, I would guess to compete better with SUVs and make them more competitive vs other vehicles.

I wonder if this is something Akio spearheaded, considering how low AWD sales of vehicles like C-HR are in Europe for instance. More about brand image and good press than actually making money on it... I like it.

S
Top