Lexus Looking to Expand in Europe


Lexus International Vice President Mark Templin

The Lexus UK blog has an interview with International vice-president Mark Templin, and it’s filled with notable quotes:

“The company has put a lot of resources into Lexus. Finally we are doing the things I wish we had done ten years ago,” he says with a smile.

Templin, a straight- and fast-talking American, should know. He’s worked at Lexus for 25 years and watched the growing pains of a company that at times in its past has lacked decisive direction.

“Our goal is not to grow really fast, but to grow in a slow, methodical and steady way over a long, long period of time,” he says.

Some of the most interesting discussion centers around Lexus in Europe:

“We were building cars that were successful in the US, Russia, Mid-East and Japan. Those are enormous markets. But we never had the right product mix to meet European demands, until recently,” says Templin.

Templin is masterminding the global development of Lexus, and one of his jobs is to boost sales in Europe and the Middle East to catch up with the US.

“We have a great position in the US and now is the time to develop our new models and range of cars for a global audience,” he says.

The focus on hybrid technology has made the brand a compelling alternative to its German competitors in Europe — with a model like the NX coming to market, there’s a real opportunity to start building some momentum.

Read the full Mark Templin Interview on the Lexus UK blog

Comments


  • corradoMR2

    Economies of scale is the norm these days in any business to survive which is not necessarily a bad thing. But when certain products, colors, or options are not available (or not made available even for special order) in certain markets, this is a severely missed opportunity. Case in point, IS 300h, RC 300h, RX 450h F-Sport, leather seats for the IS F-Sport, and so on, not in the N. American market? And my US neighbors who are 10x the Canadian market, don’t get USB for the IS while we do???

  • Tamarisk

    I’m currently living in Poland for a while. Wanted to go to the nearest Lexus dealership down here in the southern part of the country, but unfortunately when I called them no one there speaks English. I would have to travel an additional 25 miles to the next dealership in Krakow which has English speakers. Maybe others will say well why don’t you speak Polish, but I would reply that for a lesser car brand, I wouldn’t make a big deal about the language, but for a luxury brand such as Lexus, this is a huge mistake. Each dealership should have at least one English speaker.

  • Erich Kerner

    Then let´s see what Lexus have to offer in the near future for e.g. Europe. I believe Lexus will have “a long Way to go” in Europe to win customers for Lexus hybrids models. In many countrys in Europe still diesel powered cars are the big sellers.
    and in the meantime – i have to say – i think this will not Change very fast in Europe. Take a look what Toyota did in Europe. Adding BMW diesel engines to the lineup to sell more cars.

  • MT

    What new car came to the market recently? They will continue to crap along in western Europe. Now again “special products for European market, blabla” is starting. As with the CT. And the CT is a huge success all over the world, except for western Europe. The NX will go the same way. There need to be diesels and wagon variants of the sedans. This is how it is and no Mark Templin blabla will change that.

  • sebisab93

    If they want to expand in Europe, they need some Diesel engines and estates.
    And they should have more rim selections, leather colours, more wood selections etc.
    And the biggest problem is that Lexus doesn’t have many engines. And as an European, I would like to see a MT on the IS and RC!

  • Thomas

    Oh my God to the People whining on about diesel-engines! Lexus should shy away of diesel’s as if it was the plague! Please stop!

  • MT

    It is a plague in the cities. Stinky, dirty diesel. But people keep buying the sh**. And if you want a share of the car market you either build it or leave it. You can’t have a share of the coffee market by selling tea now, can you?

  • Justin

    Personally I think Lexus is in trouble, as it currently sits neither in the luxury camp nor the sporty camp. As Consumer Reports so publicly said in the US, the new IS250 is a dud for this very reason. The best way to alienate your existing customers, including me, is to put an LFA dashboard and hard seats (both regular and sports) into the new IS but keep the lackluster engine and chaotic satnav interface.

    The next most pressing issue for Lexus is not just to continue with the styling offensive, but also as corradoMR2 says, to offer way more options. Do what the Germans are doing – if I want an IS300h with soft semi-aniline seats, a genuine spare tire, real metal inlay (not silver plastic), and drilled aluminum pedals, why not let me pay for it?

  • OlFius

    Sorry, I’m not agree, this has nothing to do with Lexus but this is something locally determinative. Why only English, and not Chinese, Spanish, French….
    English is a main language, agree, but that doesn’t mean the only language.

  • F1orce

    But drive one of the modern CRDi diesel vehicles and you’ll see why people buy them.

    Excellent MPG, performance & refinement.

  • F1orce

    “The company has put a lot of resources into Lexus. Finally we are doing the things I wish we had done ten years ago,” he says with a smile.

    Templin, a straight- and fast-talking American, should know. He’s worked at Lexus for 25 years and watched the growing pains of a company that at times in its past has lacked decisive direction.”

    UHMM TEMPLIN MUST BE ON DRUGS BECAUSE BEFORE THE SPIDNLE-GRILL LEXUS WAS DOING GREAT AND BEATING THE GERMANS BIG TIME IN THE U.S. MARKET
    NOW WITH ALL THEIR EFFORTS LEXUS HAS LOST ITS IDENTITY AND ALSO LOST ITS CORE CUSTOMERS.

  • Erich Kerner

    i didn´t wanted to say with my comment that a diesel engine is “the right choice” for a premium luxury car or SUV these days. Even in Europe. Hybrid is the best choice i think. I just wanted to say that i have learned over the last few years that the diesel car market in Europe won´t disappear in the near future…..